Winter holiday closures - see more

While you're waiting

by: 
Emily, Columbine Library

I still remember reading The Thirteenth Tale when it debuted in 2006.  Diane Setterfield’s atmospheric, gothic tale was a page turner, perfect for chilly weather reading, preferably in a cozy spot with something warm to sip on.   I’ve been periodically checking the author’s name on Amazon and in the library’s catalog ever since, hoping to find that she had published another book.  All those years of keeping her name filed in the back of my brain have paid off with the discovery that Diane Setterfield’s second novel, Bellman and Black, is finally out.  This new book promises another ghostly tale as we head into the dark and cold months of the year.

Here are other gothic tales that will keep you satisfied until you have a Diane Setterfield novel in your hands.

The Distant Hours by Kate Morton begins with Edie’s quest to solve the long buried secrets surrounding her mother’s time spent at Milderhurst Castle during the Blitz.  What she finds are the Blythe sisters, the last in the family line living at the estate in Kent, whose numerous tragedies and long dead romances are tangled up with her own mother’s story.

The Monsters of Templeton by Lauren Groff tells a modern, gothic story with plenty of family secrets and delicious scandal.   Prepare to be entertained and intrigued when you sit down with this one.

Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier is an atmospheric, suspenseful, and dark tale with memorable characters set on an eery Cornish estate overlooking the sea.  Get lost in the world of Manderley with the new Mrs. de Winter as she deals with the haunted memory of her predecessor, Rebecca.

by: 
Sean, Standley Lake Library

Have you heard of the Digital Public Library of America? It's a non-profit organization that's taking historical works and archives from several state libraries and cultural organizations and making them available to patrons from all over the world. Part library, part museum, the Digital Public Library of America offers over 2.4 million free resources, has incredible exhibitions of art, photographs and manuscripts, and includes collections from the New York Public Library, the Smithsonian, and the National Archives.

Their website launched just the other day, and it's a great place to go for anyone interested in exploring our history and shared heritage. The wealth of information it conveys is suitable for students at all levels, and contains fascinating insights into thousands of topics. Of course, you don't have to be doing research to enjoy the DPLA! You can think of their site as the ultimate highbrow timewaster! (And come on, you were probably getting tired of playing Pacman, right)?

by: 
Katie, Arvada Library

Looking for something a little different to get your spring reading going?  These forthcoming non-fiction titles are all set for release in April and are all on order here at JCPL, ready for you to put on hold today.  

Down the Up Escalator: How the 99 percent live in the Great Recession, by Barbara Garson
The author relays personal accounts of some of those affected by the recession along with historical background that gives insight into how our economic system was set up to fail. Release date April 2, 2013.

Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, by David Sedaris
Essays by the celebrated humorist take the reader on an around-the-world tour of the absurd. Release date April 23, 2013.

Cooked : a natural history of transformation, by Michael Pollan
Acclaimed food author Pollan looks at the four elements (earth, air, fire and water) to uncover how cooking connects and transforms us. Release date April 23, 2013.

 

by: 
Emily, Columbine Library

Where are you on the hold list for Downton Abbey, season 1, 2, or 3?  Here are some suggestions for British drama to tide you over until it’s ready!  Feel free to chime in with your own ideas, too.

The Cazelets

Coming Home

The Forsyte Saga

The Pallisers

Upstairs Downstairs

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