Nov. 26 & 27 - All libraries will be closed for Thanksgiving.


New Arrivals

When her best friend's beau is found murdered in the basement of the town museum, Dorothy Martin explores the victim's identity as a veteran, curator, and history teacher while investigating the disappearance of his young assistant.

Hilda Johansson, a Swedish maid in South Bend Indiana, is asked by her brother to investigate the murder of his sixth-grade teacher.

Sleuthing American widow Dorothy Martin goes undercover as a temporary secretary for a London computer company to solve a murder. The victim was an American director of a firm making software. By the author of Death in Lacquer Red.

"The O. Henry Prize Stories 2015 gathers twenty of the best short stories of the year, selected from thousands published in literary magazines. The winning stories span the globe - from the glamorous Riviera to an Eastern European shtetl, from a Native American reservation to a tiny village in Thailand. But their characters are universally recognizable and utterly compelling, whether they are ex-pats in Africa, migrant workers crossing the Mexican border, Armenian immigrants on the rough streets of East Hollywood, or pioneers in nineteenth-century Idaho. Accompanying the stories are the editor's introduction, essays from the eminent jurors on their favorite stories, observations from the winning writers on what inspired them, and an extensive resource list of magazines."--provided by publisher.

""No Dog Should Die Alone" was the attention-grabbing - and heart-stirring - headline of journalist Laura T. Coffey's TODAY show website story about photographer Lori Fusaro's work with senior shelter pets. While generally calm, easy, and already house-trained, these animals often represent the highest-risk population at shelters. With gorgeous, joyful photographs and sweet, funny, true tales of "old dogs learning new tricks," Coffey and Fusaro show that adopting a senior can be even more rewarding than choosing a younger dog. You'll meet endearing elders like Marnie, the irresistible shih tzu who has posed for selfies with Tina Fey, James Franco, and Betty White; Remy, a soulful nine-year-old dog adopted by elderly nuns; George Clooney's cocker spaniel, Einstein; and Bretagne, the last known surviving search dog from Ground Zero. They may be slower moving and a tad less exuberant than puppies, but these pooches prove that adopting a senior brings immeasurable joy, earnest devotion, and unconditional love"-- Provided by publisher.

The award-winning author of Ancient Grains for Modern Meals, Maria Speck makes cooking with ancient grains faster, more intuitive, and easier than ever before in this collection of recipes, most of which are gluten-free.

"The endearing true story of a Type-A mom struggling to care for a daughter who has Type 1 diabetes--and the incredible service dog who changes their lives for the better. Stefany Shaheen takes readers on an emotional journey as she tries everything to manage her daughter Elle's deadly and unpredictable disease, all while juggling a family of four children. Overcoming the skepticism that a dog can provide answers that medical science is still seeking, the family finds a resounding sense of peace and reassurance through Coach's near miraculous abilities as a medic-alert dog, specially trained to detect dangerous changes in blood sugar levels. Elle & Coach is a story of determination and finding hope in the most unlikely of places"-- Provided by publisher.

"From modern-day Roanoke Island to the sweeping backdrop of North Carolina's Blue Ridge Mountains and Roosevelt's WPA folklore writers, past and present intertwine to create an unexpected destiny. Restaurant owner Whitney Monroe is desperate to save her business from a hostile takeover. The inheritance of a decaying Gilded Age hotel on North Carolina's Outer Banks may provide just the ray of hope she needs. But things at the Excelsior are more complicated than they seem. Whitney's estranged stepfather is entrenched on the third floor, and the downstairs tenants are determined to save the historic building. Searching through years of stored family heirlooms may be Whitney's only hope of quick cash, but will the discovery of an old necklace and a Depression-era love story change everything?" -- Provided by publisher.

Two women find love but are forced to choose between their feelings for each other and their families. Trapped in a dead-end day job in a department store, stage designer Therese Belivet finds her life forever changed when she encounters--and falls in love with--Carol Aird, a suburban housewife in the midst of a divorce.

Samantha Shaw, single mother and owner of Heart Mates Dating Service, must help her ornery magician grandfather clear his name when he is accused of murdering his rival, Shane Masters, and bring the real killer, who is the master of illusion, to justice.

An account of the cat-and-mouse game between the Obama administration and most-wanted terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki traces the president's shifting campaigns and the evolution of the robotic technology that ended Awlaki's life.

The Garden Conservancy is celebrating their 25th anniversary with this beautifully illustrated book that documents a selection of the outstanding public and private gardens they have worked with since their founding in 1989. The book showcases eight gardens the conservancy has helped preserve and 43 of the more than 3,000 private gardens across the country that have been opened to the public through its Open Days Program. The private gardens cover a wide variety of regions, habitats, designs and plants, from early spring through autumn. Featured private gardens include Panayoti Kelaidis's rock garden in Denver, Colorado; Deborah Whigham and Gary Ratway's collection of native and Mediterranean plants and earth walls in Albion, California; and James David's imaginative mix of heat-tolerant plants, rills and pools in Austin, Texas.

"The devastating story of Jedwabne, which was the basis of Jan Gross's controversial Neighbors (2001). Based on the author's encounters with witnesses, survivors, murderers, and their helpers between 2000 and 2004, The Crime and the Silence raises important questions about the responsibility of Poles for the Holocaust"-- Provided by publisher.

"Features detailed, full-color photos of more than 100 rooms and more than 500 practical tips to help you renovate and decorate like a pro"--Back cover.

"Parenting expert Kim John Payne, M.Ed., flips the script on children's challenging or defiant behavior and lays out an elegantly simple plan to support parents in establishing loving, age-sensitive boundaries that help children feel safe and settled"-- Provided by publisher.

"Truly the voice of a generation, George Carlin gave the world some of the most hysterical and iconic comedy routines of the last fifty years. From the "Seven Dirty Words" to "A Place for My Stuff," to "Religion is Bullshit," he perfected the art of making audiences double over with laughter while simultaneously making people wake up to the realities (and insanities) of life in the twentieth century. Few people glimpsed the inner life of this beloved comedian, but his only child, Kelly, was there to see it all. Born at the very beginning of his decades-long career in comedy, she slid around the "old Dodge Dart," as he and wife Brenda drove around the country to "hell gigs." She witnessed his transformation in the '70s, as he fought back against--and talked back to--the establishment; she even talked him down from a really bad acid trip a time or two. Kelly not only watched her father constantly reinvent himself and his comedy, but also had a front row seat to the roller coaster turmoil of her family's inner life. But having been the only "adult" in her family prepared her little for the task of her own adulthood. All the while, Kelly sought to define her own voice as she separated from the shadow of her father's genius. With rich humor and deep insight, Kelly Carlin pulls back the curtain on what it was like to grow up as the daughter of one of the most recognizable comedians of our time, and become a woman in her own right. This vivid, hilarious, heartbreaking story is at once singular and universal-it is a contemplation of what it takes to move beyond the legacy of childhood, and forge a life of your own"-- Provided by publisher.

"In The Mind Connection, Joyce Meyer explains how to improve the quality of your thoughts and your life. She explores the undeniable connection between the mind, mouth, moods, and attitudes, so that you can develop and maintain the right mental position no matter what challenges you face. Through practical advice and Scriptural insights, Joyce will help you learn to think with purpose, gain greater confidence, and claim the fulfilling life you were meant to lead" -- Provided by publisher.

"One game. Six students. Five survivors. It was only ever meant to be a game played by six best friends in their first year at Oxford University; a game of consequences, silly forfeits, and childish dares. But then the game changed: the stakes grew higher and the dares more personal and more humiliating, finally evolving into a vicious struggle with unpredictable and tragic results. Now, fourteen years later, the remaining players must meet again for the final round. Who knows better than your best friends what would break you? A gripping psychological thriller partly inspired by the author's own time at Oxford University"-- Provided by publisher.

It's time for Handmade Blue Plum, an annual arts and crafts fair, and Kath and her knitting group TGIF (Thank Goodness It's Fiber) plan to kick off the festivities with a yarn bombing. But they're not the only ones needling Blue Plum. Bagpiper and former resident Hugh McPhee had just returned after a long absence, yet his reception is anything but cozy. The morning after his arrival, he's found dead in full piper's regalia. Although shaken, Kath and her knitting group go forward with their yarn installation--only to hit a deadly snag. Now, with the help of Geneva, the ghost who haunts her shop, Kath and TGIF need to unravel the mystery before someone else gets kilt!

"Eileen Pollack had grown up in the 1960s and 70s dreaming of a career as a theoretical astrophysicist. Denied the chance to take advanced courses in science and math, she nonetheless made her way to Yale, where, despite finding herself far behind the men in her classes, she went on to graduate, summa cum laude, with honors, as one of the university's first two women to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in physics. And yet, isolated, lacking in confidence, starved for encouragement, she abandoned her ambition to become a physicist. Years later, Pollack revisited her reasons for walking away from the career she once had coveted. She spent six years interviewing her former teachers and classmates and dozens of other women who had dropped out before completing their degrees in science. In addition, Pollack talked to experts in the field of gender studies and reviewed the most up-to-date research that seeks to document why women and minorities underperform in STEM fields. Girls who study science and math are still belittled and teased by their male peers and teachers, even by other girls. They are led to think that any interest or achievement in science or math will diminish their popularity. They are still being steered away from advanced courses in technical fields, while deeply entrenched stereotypes lead them to see themselves as less talented than their male classmates, a condition that causes them to fulfill such expectations and perform more poorly than the boys sitting beside them. "--Provided by publisher.

A love story set in Naples in 1772 and based on the romantic entanglements of Lord and Lady Hamilton and Lord Nelson.

"Oliver Sacks has always been fascinated by islands -- their remoteness, their mystery, above all the unique forms of life they harbor. For him, islands conjure up equally the romance of Melville and Stevenson, the adventure of Magellan and Cook, and the scientific wonder of Darwin and Wallace. Drawn to the tiny Pacific atoll of Pingelap by intriguing reports of an isolated community of islanders born totally color-blind, Sacks finds himself setting up a clinic in a one-room island dispensary, where he listens to these achromatopic islanders describe their colorless world in rich terms of pattern and tone, luminance and shadow. And on Guam, where he goes to investigate the puzzling neurodegenerative paralysis endemic there for a century, he becomes, for a brief time, an island neurologist, making house calls with his colleague John Steele, amid crowing cockerels, cycad jungles, and the remains of a colonial culture. The islands reawaken Sacks' lifelong passion for botany -- in particular, for the primitive cycad trees, whose existence dates back to the Paleozoic -- and the cycads are the starting point for an intensely personal reflection on the meaning of islands, the dissemination of species, the genesis of disease, and the nature of deep geologic time. Out of an unexpected journey, Sacks has woven an unforgettable narrative which immerses us in the romance of island life, and shares his own compelling vision of the complexities of being human"--Publisher's description.