Books

New Arrivals

Olenin, a young Russian aristocrat finds himself as a Russian army officer, serving at a remote Cossack outpost in the Caucasus. Here among the Tatars, the Chechens, and the Old Believers, is the place where Olenin will find his love, a beautiful Cossack girl. The only problem is she is promised to a Cossack warrior.

Combines Napoleon Hill's thirteen steps to success with case studies of noteworthy women, outlining a master plan for success for all women.

An actress in the porn industry describes her unusual life and discusses her views on women and sexuality as well as offering an inside look into the industry and her relationships with other actors, including her husband.

"In more than 150 frisky photos and stories, at turns hilarious and heartbreaking, 'Colorado mountain dogs' captures the joy and rapture of canines and their human companions as they frolic on trails, in camp, and in creeks. Also included are sidebars on how to photograph dogs, reasons why people have dogs, training tips, and the naming of dogs"--From publisher description.

Drawing from historical records about Andre's life as well as a wealth of anecdotes from his colleagues in the wrestling world, including Hulk Hogan, and his film co-stars (Billy Crystal, Robin Wright, Mandy Patinkin, etc), Brown has created this biography of one of the twentieth century's most recognizable figures.

In Is That a Fact?, author Dr. Joe Schwarcz carefully navigates through the storm of misinformation to help us separate fact from folly and shrewdness from foolishness.

Shares recipes for preparing homemade versions of such classic snack foods as Lorna Doone shortbread cookies, Fig Newtons, Cheetos, Cracker Jacks, and orange creamsicles.

Citing formidable recovery rates for people addicted to prescription opiates or heroin, a guide inspired by the experiences of addicts in long-term recovery outlines treatment approaches based on new understandings about opiate addiction.

"By the president of the prestigious Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, the life story of the most controversial, volatile, misunderstood provision of the Bill of Rights"-- Provided by publisher.

An updated edition of the author's definitive illustrated guide to pruning is a must-have for gardeners that is organized around common types of plants such as evergreen and deciduous shrubs, bamboos and tea roses, rhododendrons, camellia wisteria and other vines, and tree species from dogwoods to weeping cherries.

"When the teenage daughter of a powerful Washington, D.C., judge is found dead, three local black kids are arrested for her murder but reporter Sully Carter suspects there's more to the case. From the city's grittiest backstreets to the elegant halls of power, wry yet wounded Sully pursues a string of cold cases, all the while fighting against pressure from government officials, police, suspicious locals, and his own bosses at the newspaper. Based on the real-life 1990s Princeton Place murders" -- Provided by publisher.

A spirited, history-rich narrative on the art and science of alcohol that discusses everything from fermentation and distillation to traditions and the effects of alcohol on the body and brain.

"Laura Pritchett is an award-winning author who has quickly become one of the west's defining literary voices. We first met hardscrabble ranchers Renny and Ben Cross in Laura's debut collection, and now in Stars Go Blue, they are estranged, elderly spouses living on opposite ends of their sprawling ranch, faced with the particular decline of a fading farm and Ben's struggle with Alzheimer's disease. He is just on the cusp of dementia, able to recognize he is sick but unable to do anything about it -the notes he leaves in his pockets and around the house to remind him of himself, his family, and his responsibilities are no longer as helpful as they used to be. Watching his estranged wife forced into care-taking and brought to her breaking point, Ben decides to leave his life with whatever dignity and grace remains. As Ben makes his decision, a new horrible truth comes to light: Ray, the abusive husband of their late daughter is being released from prison early. This opens old wounds in Ben, his wife, his surviving daughter, and four grandchildren. Branded with a need for justice, Ben must act before his mind leaves him, and sets off during a brutal snowstorm to confront the man who murdered his daughter. Renny, realizing he is missing, sets off to either stop or witness her husband's act of vengeance. Stars Go Blue is a triumphant novel of the American family, buffered by the workings of a ranch and the music offered by the landscape and animal life upon it. "-- Provided by publisher.

Offers advice on developing solutions that avoid blame to address such issues as how to improve a situation, recognize individual contributions, and emphasize personal solutions in order to improve service, teamwork, and adaptability.

A collection of twenty-five short works by the American author written between 1950 and 1968 and originally printed in a wide range of publications including "The Atlantic Monthly," "Esquire," and "Ladies' Home Journal."

Former Justice Department operative Cotton Malone isn't looking for trouble when it comes knocking at his Copenhagen bookshop. But narrowly surviving a ferocious firefight convinces him to follow his unexpected new ally--an American Secret Service agent--and help him stop the Paris Club, a cabal of multimillionaires bent on manipulating the global economy. Only by matching wits with a terrorist-for-hire, foiling a catastrophic attack, and plunging into a desperate hunt for the legendary lost treasure of Napoleon Bonaparte can Malone hope to avert international financial anarchy.

A memoir of Boyd Varty's life in the Londolozi Game Reserve in South Africa.

Near the start of the nineteenth century, a group of eminent Protestant ministers formed a grand scheme for gathering the rest of mankind into the redemptive fold of Christianity. Its core element was a special school for youth drawn from all parts of the earth, including the Pacific Islands, China, India, and the native nations of North America. If all went well, graduates would return to join similar projects in their respective homelands. For some years, the school prospered. However, when two Cherokee students courted and married local women, fundamental ideals were put to a severe test. John Demos follows the progress and demise of this first true melting pot through the lives of individual students. Instead of encouraging reconciliation, the school exposes the limits of tolerance and sets off a chain of events that will culminate in the Trail of Tears.

Nana opens in 1867, the year of the World Fair, when Paris, thronged by a cosmopolitan elite, was la Ville Lumiere, a perfect victim for Zola's scathing denunciation of hypocrisy and fin-de-siecle moral corruption. The fate of Nana, the Helen of Troy of the Second Empire, and daughter of the laundress in L'Assommoir, reduced Flaubert to almost inarticulate gasps of admiration: `Chapter 14, unsurpassable! ... Yes! ... Christ Almighty! ... Incomparable ... Straight out of Babylon!' Boulevard society is presented with painstaking attention to detail, and Zola's documentation of the contemporary theatrical scene comes directly from his own experience - it was his own failure as a playwright which sent him back to novel-writing and Nana itself. novel-writing and Nana itself.

"Bestselling author and top business consultant D.A. Benton shows how to stay relevant and competitive in any stage of your career in today's fast-changing business environment... describes how to keep your career on an upwards trajectory through positively differentiating yourself, openness to change, self-motivation, and staying intellectually curious"--From publisher description.

"A look the relationship between the United States and Israel. There has been more than half a century of raging conflict between Jews and Arabs. John B. Judis argues that, while Israelis and Palestinians must shoulder much of the blame, the United States has been the principal power outside the region since the end of World War II and as such must account for its repeated failed efforts to resolve this enduring strife. The fatal flaw in American policy, Judis shows, can be traced back to the Truman years. What happened between 1945 and 1949 sealed the fate of the Middle East for the remainder of the century. As a result, understanding that period holds the key to explaining almost everything that follows--right down to George W. Bush's unsuccessful and ill-conceived effort to win peace through holding elections among the Palestinians, and Barack Obama's failed attempt to bring both parties to the negotiating table."-- From publisher's description.

Part of Emile Zola's multigenerational Hougon-Macquart saga, The Belly of Paris is the story of Florent Quenu, a wrongly accused man who escapes imprisonment on Devil's Island. Returning to his native Paris, Florent finds a city he barely recognizes, with its working classes displaced to make way for broad boulevards and bourgeois flats. Living with his brother's family in the newly rebuilt Les Hailes market, Florent is soon caught up in a dangerous maelstrom of food and politics. Amid intrigue among the market's sellers - the fishmonger, the charcutiere, the fruit girl, and the cheese vendor - and the glorious culinary bounty of their labors, we see the dramatic difference between "fat and thin" (the rich and the poor) and how the widening gulf between them strains a city to the breaking point.

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