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New Arrivals - Biography

The classic autobiography of a runaway slave who became Abraham Lincoln's advisor and the Counsel Generalto Haiti.

"... Lucinda Franks, a Pulitzer Prize?winning journalist, tells the intimate story of her marriage to Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, one of the great men of our time. After Lucinda interviewed Bob for The New York Times in 1973, the two took a while to understand that they had fallen in love. Franks was a self-styled radical who marched with protesters and chained herself to fences. Morgenthau was a famous lawyer, a symbol of the establishment, who could have helped put her in jail. She was twenty-six. He was fifty-three. Now, thirty-six years into a marriage that was never supposed to happen, one between two people as deeply in love as they are different, they are living proof that opposites can forge an unbreakable life bond"-- Publisher description.

The only four-time champion of the hit ABC reality show "Dancing with the Stars" shares the lessons he has learned on and off the dance floor that helped him embrace and overcome daily challenges, along with behind-the-scenes stories from the show.

Traces the author's spiritual journey in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, which led him to Quaker meetings, Catholic masses, and sessions with an astrologer in search of connection to the world.

In this inspirational and entertaining book, you will learn what makes Phil Robertson tick. Robertson shares his views on faith--and how it has totally changed his way of life and how he treats others; family--how he raised his kids and is raising grandkids while teaching them the life principles he lives by; ducks--and the business principles that started the Duck Commander empire; marriage--including what he?s learned from his own marriage; and of course, his opinions on controversial topics like gun control, taxes, prayer in school, and the government.

Benny Binion was a cowboy, a pioneering casino owner, a gangster, a killer, and the founder of the hugely successful World Series of Poker. Doug J. Swanson tells the story of Binion's role in shaping modern Las Vegas.

Looks at the rise and downfall of Warren Jeffs who set up and ruled an enclave in Utah characterized by polygamy and forced marriages.

Describes the true story of how the eccentric Polish scientist tasked by the Nazis to create a typhus vaccine hid the intelligentsia from the Gestapo by hiring them to work in his laboratory. The team engaged in a sabotage campaign by sending illegal doses of the vaccine into the Polish ghettos while shipping gallons of the weakened serum to the German troops on the Eastern Front. Among the scientists saved by Weigl, who was a Christian, was a gifted Jewish immunologist named Ludwik Fleck, who risked his life to carry out a dramatic subterfuge to vaccinate the most endangered prisoners in Buchenwald.

"Henri Charrière, called 'Papillon,' for the butterfly tattoo on his chest, was convicted in Paris in 1931 of a murder he did not commit. Sentenced to life imprisonment in the penal colony of French Guiana, he became obsessed with one goal: escape. After planning and executing a series of treacherous yet failed attempts over many years, he was eventually sent to the notorious prison, Devil's Island, a place from which no one had ever escaped, until Papillon. His flight to freedom remains one of the most incredible feats of human cunning, will, and endurance ever undertaken"--From publisher description.

Moses is pictured as idealist reformer and political manipulator as his rise to power and eventual domination of New York State politics is documented.

"The intensive research undertaken for this book properly identifies forty-five Native American silversmiths and their hallmarks found on Southwest jewelry. Most of the marks date prior to the 1970s and some as early as the 1920s, along with the marks of traders, guilds, and the government. [The book] also provides the stories of the artists and institutions represented by these marks"--Page [2] of cover.

Spanning the years 1940-1965, this third volume in Manchester's biography picks up shortly after Churchill became prime minister, as his tiny island nation stood alone against the overwhelming might of Nazi Germany.

"Growing up, Pat O'Brien was the skinny Midwestern kid with the divorced parents and the alcoholic father. He drove himself to the University of South Dakota after finishing his last late-night shift and moved in while his roommate was asleep. His life was unceremonious--until he was picked up in the student center by a professor who envisioned his future as the household television name he would become. From that day forward, Pat's life became anything but ordinary: from afternoons in the late Bobby Kennedy's living room with Muhammad Ali, to Rangers games in President Bush's suite, to the drugs and drinking and party lifestyle of Los Angeles. Over the course of his career, Pat has met everyone: the Beatles, the Kennedys, Neil Young, and Magic Johnson. In I'll Be Back Right After This, Pat reveals the highs and lows of life spent sharing the mic with the world's most rich and famous"-- Provided by publisher.

"Raised as an Army brat, Angie Ricketts thought she knew what she was in for when she eloped with Jack?then an infantry lieutenant?on the eve of his deployment to Somalia. Since that time, Jack, now a colonel, has been deployed eight times, serving four tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. And Ricketts, has lived every one of those deployments intimately?distant enough to survive the years spent apart from her husband, but close enough to share a common purpose and a lifestyle they both love. With humor, candor, and a brazen attitude, Ricketts pulls back the curtain on a subculture many readers know, but few ever will experience. Counter to the dramatized snap shot seen on Lifetime?s 'Army wives,' Ricketts digs into the personalities and posturing that officers? wives must survive daily, whether navigating a social event on post, suffering through a husband?s prolonged deployment or reacting to a close friend?s death in combat. At its core, 'No man?s war' is a story of sisterhood and survival"--From publisher description.

Offers a look at the life of the man who is fourth in line to Britain's throne.

The author recounts his harrowing experiences of being trapped for six days in Blue John Canyon in Utah and having to amputate his own right arm in order to save his own life.

"Eighty-six-year-old Betty Halbreich is a true original. A tough broad who could have stepped straight out of Stephen Sondheim?s repertoire, she has spent nearly forty years as the legendary personal shopper at Bergdorf Goodman, where she works with socialites, stars, and ordinary women off the street. She has helped many find their true selves through clothes, frank advice, and her own brand of wisdom. She is trusted by the most discriminating persons, including Hollywood?s top stylists, to tell them what looks best. But Halbreich?s personal transformation from a cosseted young girl to a fearless truth teller is the greatest makeover of her career. A Chicago native, Halbreich moved to Manhattan at twenty after marrying the dashing Sonny Halbreich, a true character right out of Damon Runyon who liked the nightlife of New York in the fifties. On the surface, they were a great match, but looks can be deceiving; an unfaithful Sonny was emotionally distant while Halbreich became increasingly anguished. After two decades, the fraying marriage finally came undone. Bereft without Sonny and her identity as his wife, she hit rock bottom. After she began the frightening process of reclaiming herself and started therapy, Halbreich was offered a lifeline in the form of a job at the legendary luxury store Bergdorf Goodman. Soon, she was asked to run the store?s first personal shopping service. It was a perfect fit. Meticulous, impeccable, hardworking, elegant, and, most of all, delightfully funny, Halbreich has never been afraid to tell it to her clients straight. She won?t sell something just to sell it. If an outfit or shoe or purse is too expensive, she?ll dissuade you from buying it. As Halbreich says, 'There are two things nobody wants to face: their closet and their mirror.' She helps women do both, every day"--From publisher description.

Shades of Gray, Splashes of Color narrates Bill Cooke's 2011 hike of the 486-mile Colorado Trail, the length of which was a personal high for him in 35 years of backpacking. A common expression among long distance backpackers is "no pain equals no gain." In this book, you'll read of the "pain" manifested in the struggle of the journey, and you'll read of the "gains," the triumphs as Bill and his hiking companion Keith "Northern Harrier" Bance savor the many rewards of this enchanting trail.

The singer, drummer, and percussionist traces her career through four decades of Latin and pop music, sharing details from her tours with fellow artists and her solo career while revealing how her faith has helped her heal from sexual abuse.

"In the late 1960s, Cea Sunrise Person's subversive family fled to the Canadian wilderness to grow pot, embrace free love, and live off the land. A riveting memoir of growing up off the grid amid multiple generations of dysfunction, 'North of normal' chronicles one woman's journey to reclaim her life on her own terms"--From pubisher description.

The 1950s had rock 'n' roll and the 60s had the Beats. In the 70s and 80s, it was punk rock and modern art. But for the 1990s, it was all about the fashion?and Kate Moss, Marc Jacobs, and Alexander McQueen were the trio of rebel geniuses who made it great.

With eye-catching artwork, step-by-step diagrams, and illustrations that break down complicated ideas into manageable concepts, The Science Book will have readers conversant in genetic engineering, black holes, and global warming in no time. Includes mini-biographies of the most well-known scientists and a glossary of helpful scientific terms.

"At nineteen years old, Nicole C. Kear's biggest concern is choosing a major--until she walks into a doctor's office in midtown Manhattan and gets a life-changing diagnosis. She is going blind, courtesy of an eye disease called retinitis pigmentosa, and has only a decade or so before Lights Out. Instead of making preparations as the doctor suggests, Kear decides to carpe diem and make the most of the vision she has left. She joins circus school, tears through boyfriends, travels the world, and through all these hi-jinks, she keeps her vision loss a secret. When Kear becomes a mother, just a few years shy of her vision's expiration date, she amends her carpe diem strategy, giving up recklessness in order to relish every moment with her kids. Her secret, though, is harder to surrender, and as her vision deteriorates, harder to keep hidden. As her world grows blurred, one thing becomes clear: no matter how hard she fights, she won't win the battle against blindness. But if she comes clean with her secret, and comes to terms with the loss, she can still win her happy ending"-- Provided by publisher.

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