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New Arrivals - Biography

The visual artist behind such cult films as "Hairspray" traces his haphazard cross-country hitchhiking journey at the sides of a motley group of unsuspecting drivers, including a gentle farmer, an indie band, and the author's unexpected hero.

The story of Richard Williams, the father who raised and trained two of the greatest women in sports, Venus and Serena Williams.

"Irreverent, insightful, and blatantly honest, Deborah takes us along on her inspiring journey of self-discovery and renewal after she is forced to flee Afghanistan in 2007. She first lands in California, where she feels like a misfit teetering on the brink of sanity. Where was that fearless redhead who stared danger in the face back in Kabul? After being advised to commune with glowworms and sit in contemplation for one year, Rodriguez finally packs her life and her cat into her Mini Cooper and moves to a seaside town in Mexico. Despite having no plan, no friends, and no Spanish, a determined Rodriguez soon finds herself swept up in a world where the music never stops and a new life can begin. Her adventures and misadventures among the expats and locals help lead the way to new love, new family, and a new sense of herself."--www.Amazon.com.

"In 1928, 16-year-old Minka was on a picnic in the woods when she was assaulted and raped [and became pregnant]. The baby was secretly born, named Betty Jane, and given up for adoption. For decades, Minka wrote letters trying to get news of her daughter; she kept loving and praying for her, even though she never dared believe they would meet again. Until nearly eighty years later, when Minka whispered [a] secret, impossible prayer for the first time ... Unbeknownst to Minka, that very same day, a judge was releasing the sealed adoption records to her 77-year-old daughter. And soon, Minka's phone would ring"--Amazon.com.

Draws on interviews with family members, castmates, and other insiders to trace the life and career of the late star of "The Sopranos," providing coverage of his Rutgers education, complicated relationships, and breakout roles.

Shortly after Don and Mindy Wallace move to Manhattan to jump-start their writing careers, they learn of a house for sale in a village they once visited on a tiny French island off the Brittany coast. Desperate for a life change, the Wallaces bravely (and impulsively) buy it almost sight unseen. What they find when they arrive is a ruin, and it isn't long before their lives begin to resemble it--with hilarious and heartwarming results.

Mariano Rivera tells his story for the first time: the championships, the bosses (including the Boss), the rivalries, the struggles of being a Latino baseball player in the United States, and of maintaining Christian values in professional athletics. The twelve-time All-Star will discuss what it's like to run up to that mound with the game, or the season squarely on his shoulders.

"In The Explorers, ... author Martin Dugard shares the rich saga of the Burton and Speke expedition. To better understand their motivations and ultimate success, Dugard guides readers through the seven vital traits that Burton and Speke, as well as many of history's legendary explorers, called upon to see their impossible journeys through to the end: curiosity, hope, passion, courage, independence, self-discipline, and perseverance. In doing so, Dugard demonstrates that we are all explorers, and that these traits have a most practical application in everyday life."--from WorldCat.org

The opera star describes her childhood in the segregated South, the values that shaped her ambitions, her meteoric rise at the Berlin Opera, and the accomplishments that have established her as one of America's most decorated singers.

"Imagine being trapped inside a Disney movie and having to learn about life mostly from animated characters dancing across a screen of color. A fantasy? A nightmare? This is the real-life story of Owen Suskind, the son of the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind and his wife, Cornelia. An autistic boy who couldn't speak for years, Owen memorized dozens of Disney movies, turned them into a language to express love and loss, kinship, brotherhood. The family was forced to become animated characters, communicating with him in Disney dialogue and song; until they all emerge, together, revealing how, in darkness, we all literally need stories to survive"-- Provided by publisher.

A thirty-nine-year-old adoptee describes his discovery that his birthfather is one of the most infamous and still-wanted serial killers in American history, forcing him to reconsider everything he thought he knew about himself.

A CIA veteran with extensive experience in covert operations presents a guide to the art of spycraft while illuminating the CIA's essential role, sharing a cautionary message about its recent transition toward paramilitary activities.

"James Webb, author of Fields of Fire, the classic novel of the Vietnam War--former U.S. Senator; Secretary of the Navy; recipient of the Navy Cross, Silver Star and Purple Heart as a combat Marine; and a self-described "military brat"--has written an extraordinary memoir of his early years, "a love story--love of family, love of country, love of service," in his words. Webb's mother grew up in the poverty-stricken cotton fields of Eastern Arkansas. His father and life-time hero was the first of many generations of Webbs, whose roots are in Appalachia, to finish high school. He flew bombers in World War II, cargo planes in the Berlin Airlift, graduated from college in middle age, and became an expert in the nation's most advanced weaponry. Webb's account of his childhood is a tremendous American saga as the family endures the constant moves and challenges of the rarely examined Post-World War II military, with his stern but emotionally invested father, loving and resolute mother, a granite-like grandmother who held the family together during his father's frequent deployments, and an assortment of invincible aunts, siblings, and cousins. His account of his four years at Annapolis are painfully honest but in the end triumphant. His description of Vietnam's most brutal battlefields breaks new literary ground. One of the most highly decorated combat Marines of that war, he is a respected expert on the history and conduct of the war. Webb's novelist's eyes and ears invest this work with remarkable power, whether he is describing the resiliency that grew from constant relocations during his childhood, the longing for his absent father, his poignant goodbye to his parents as he leaves for Vietnam, his role as a 23-year-old lieutenant through months of constant combat, or his election to the Senate where he was known for his expertise in national defense, foreign policy, and economic fairness. This is a life that could only happen in America" -- from publisher's web site.

The Mannings take a hard look at their careers and all of American football, the big-money madness, race relations within the NFL, bribery in college recruiting, the college game as compared to the pros, coaches-good and bad, why the quarterback is the most difficult one of all sports, and organizational sports where white youngsters aren't out there playing the game like they used to.

This is the story of those brave men and their families, how they fought both in battle and to be accepted in an American society that remained biased against them even after they returned home as heroes. Based on interviews with relatives, friends, and soldiers who served alongside the men, as well as personal letters and photographs, The Ghosts of Hero Street is the compelling and inspiring account of a street of soldiers--and men--who would not be denied their dignity or their honor.

In this poignant memoir, Claudia Williams, the last surviving child of legendary Boston Red Sox great and Hall of Famer Ted Williams, tells her father's story, including never before told anecdotes about his life on and off the field that reveal the flesh and blood man behind "The Kid." Born after her father retired from baseball, Claudia Williams grew up with little idea that her dad was one of the most revered sports figures of all time, until she finally saw him in uniform at Fenway Park, receiving the adulation of thousands of fans.

The singer and star of "Braxton Family Values" reveals the measures she took to make herself and her family whole again after heart ailments and a diagnosis of lupus forced her to let go of her past and take charge of her own healing--physically and spiritually.

After thirty-eight happy years of marriage to influential producer Aaron Spelling, raising two children in Hollywood, and co-managing one of the largest estates in the country (finally selling Spelling Manor, as detailed on her HGTV series, for $85 million), Candy is now adjusting to life on her own--downsizing to a Century City condo. She's ready to share the most intimate details of her life with Aaron; how his illness caused her to question her identity; and how she's reinvented herself as an independent woman, businesswoman, and television personality. Along the way, Candy reveals all-new dishy stories including those of Hollywood friends Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Michael Jackson, Janet Leigh, Dean Martin, and Elizabeth Taylor (her lifelong rival over their jewelry).

"One of the most famous books ever written about a man's search for faith and peace. While still in his early twenties, Meron, an intensley passionate and brilliant man, found that nothing in his worldly life assuaged a growing restlessness. His curiosity about spiritual matters led him first to baptism as a Catholic and ultimately to entry into a Trappist monastery...there he wrote this...testament, a unique spiritual autobiography of a man who withdrew from the world only after he had fully immersed himself in it..."--P. 4 of cover.

One half of the Righteous Brothers describes his life, from entering amateur singing contests to pioneering the group whose song, "You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin,'" was named as the most-played of the twentieth century

Blending history and memoir, retired U.S. Marshal Mike Earp--a descendant of the legendary lawman Wyatt Earp--offers an exclusive and fascinating behind the scenes look at the most storied law enforcement agency in America, illuminating its vital role in the nation's development for more than two hundred years. Mike Earp spent his career with the U.S. Marshals Service, reaching the number three position in the organization's hierarchy before he retired. In this fascinating, eye opening book, written with the service's full cooperation, he shares his experiences and takes us on a fascinating tour of this extraordinary organization, the oldest, the most effective, and the most dangerous branch of American law enforcement, and the least known.

"As John Kennedy Jr.'s creative director for George magazine, Matt Berman had a wonderfully collaborative and fun-loving relationship with America's favorite son--his story is told here with unprecedented candor and wit."--Provided by publisher.

The director, race-car aficionado, and star of Beverley Hills 90210, talks about celebrity, marriage, fatherhood, auto racing, life as a '90s icon, and the events that have shaped him.

The first paperback edition of the classic biography of the founder of the Mormon church, this book attempts to answer the questions that continue to surround Joseph Smith. Was he a genuine prophet, or a gifted fabulist who became enthralled by the products of his imagination and ended up being martyred for them? 24 pages of photos.

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