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New Arrivals - Biography

"Just as polio loomed over the 1950s, and AIDS stalked the 1980s and '90s, posttraumatic stress disorder haunts us in the early years of the twenty-first century. Over a decade into the United States' "global war on terror," PTSD afflicts as many as 30 percent of the conflict's veterans. But the disorder's reach extends far beyond the armed forces. In total, some twenty-seven million Americans are believed to be PTSD survivors. Yet to many of us, the disorder remains shrouded in mystery, secrecy, and shame. Now, David J. Morris -- a war correspondent, former Marine, and PTSD sufferer himself -- has written the essential account of this illness. Through interviews with individuals living with PTSD, forays into the scientific, literary, and cultural history of the illness, and memoir, Morris crafts a moving work that will speak not only to those with the condition and to their loved ones, but also to all of us struggling to make sense of an anxious and uncertain time"-- Provided by publisher.

Every autumn, Kenny Porpora would watch his mother scribble heartbroken messages on balloons, one for each family member they'd lost to addiction, and release them into the sky above Long Island. As the number of balloons grew, his mother fell deeper into alcoholism and depression, with daytime television her only respite from the sadness around them. When their house was foreclosed upon, Kenny's mother fled with him, his brother, and their beloved dog to the Arizona desert. There, they joined up with his drug-addicted uncle in his quixotic search for a better life, always seemingly one step away from the lucky break that would lift them out of poverty. What followed instead was an outlaw adolescence of constant upheaval, leaving young Kenny to outrun his family's tragic past. In the wake of unspeakable loss, Kenny turned to the mentors, writers, and poets he found to rebuild the family he lost, and eventually graduated from the Ivy League with a new life.

"Between 1995 and 1999, Patton Oswalt lived with an unshakable addiction. It wasn't drugs, alcohol or sex: it was film. After moving to L.A., Oswalt became a huge film buff (or as he calls it, a sprocket fiend), absorbing classics, cult hits, and new releases at the New Beverly Cinema. Silver screen celluloid became Patton's life schoolbook, informing his notion of acting, writing, comedy, and relationships. Set in the nascent days of L.A.'s alternative comedy scene, Oswalt's memoir chronicles his journey from fledgling stand-up comedian to self-assured sitcom actor, with the colorful New Beverly collective and a cast of now-notable young comedians supporting him all along the way"--Provided by publisher.

The lead singer of The Dresden Dolls reveals how she has used the power of social networking to meet basic survival needs, make friends, and strengthen communities by raising awareness and funds.

Wes Moore's The Other Wes Moore ends when Wes completes his journey from a fatherless delinquent to college graduate and heads off to Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship. But what happens next? For the next decade, Wes traced a path through some of the most high-pressure workspaces in the world, including as an American student at Oxford after 9/11, a combat officer in Afghanistan, a White House fellow during the tumult of the late Bush years, an Obama organizer during that historic campaign, a Wall Street banker at the cusp of the financial crisis, and finally, back home to Baltimore, working to revitalize that troubled city.

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