Winter holiday closures - see more

Home > Books, Movies & Music > New Arrivals > New Arrivals - Biography

New Arrivals - Biography

"... collection of never-before-published images taken over the course of Derek's final season"--Jacket.

The true story of Theodore Roosevelt's harrowing 1914 exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth, a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped tributary of the Amazon. He and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. Yet he accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it.--From publisher description.

Recounts the challenge Julia Immonen and four other women accepted to row across the Atlantic Ocean to raise awareness about the modern day slave trade, against the backdrop of Julia's own history of violent relationships.

In this full and frank memoir--a personal story of duty, family, justice, politics and resilience--New York Governor Andrew Cuomo reflects on his rise, fall, and rise in politics, and recounts his defining personal and political moments and tough but necessary lessons he has learned along the way.

"Mick Fleetwood has been a member of the ever-evolving Fleetwood Mac, one of the world's most successful and adored bands, for over four decades. Here he tells the full and candid story of his life as one of music's greatest drummers and bandleaders, the cofounder of the deeply loved supergroup that bears his name and that of his bandmate and lifelong friend John McVie. Play On sheds new light on Fleetwood Mac's raucous history, describing the highs and lows of being in the band that Fleetwood was determined to keep together."-- From publisher description.

For the last twenty-four years, Debby has been by her father?s side, as a part of his concert touring act, as well as a supportive part of his family. She has been with her dad through his four wives, through drug and alcohol addiction, and now through the shattering beginnings of Alzheimer?s disease. In her frank memoir, Campbell tells the story of her father straight from the heart.

A Colorado woman's account of being sexually molested by her father, then living under foster care after her father murdered her mother and three of her siblings; of marrying an emotionally abusive man, raising her own family, and finally learning to forgive herself and take control of her life in order to live fully and colorfully.

"One of the most influential, admired, and innovative women of our time: fashion designer, philanthropist, wife, mother, and grandmother, Diane von Furstenberg offers a book about becoming the woman she wanted to be. Diane von Furstenberg started out with a suitcase full of jersey dresses and an idea of who she wanted to be -- in her words, 'the kind of woman who is independent and who doesn't rely on a man to pay her bills.' She has since become that woman, establishing herself as a global brand and a major force in the fashion industry, all the while raising a family and maintaining 'my children are my greatest creation.' In The Woman I Wanted to Be, von Furstenberg reflects on her extraordinary life -- from childhood in Brussels to her days as a young, jet-set princess, to creating the dress that came to symbolize independence and power for an entire generation of women. With remarkable honesty and wisdom, von Furstenberg mines the rich territory of what it means to be a woman. She opens up about her family and career, overcoming cancer, building a global brand, and devoting herself to empowering other women, writing, 'I want every woman to know that she can be the woman she wants to be" -- Provided by publisher.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee traces his six-decade career through the cars he has owned, discussing how they are reflecting new understandings about the environmental impact of automobiles.

Over 150 years after her death, a widely-used scientific computer program was named ?Ada,? after Ada Lovelace, the only legitimate daughter of the eighteenth century?s version of a rock star, Lord Byron. Why? Because, after computer pioneers such as Alan Turing began to rediscover her, it slowly became apparent that she had been a key but overlooked figure in the invention of the computer. In Ada Lovelace, James Essinger makes the case that the computer age could have started two centuries ago if Lovelace?s contemporaries had recognized her research and fully grasped its implications. It?s a remarkable tale, starting with the outrageous behavior of her father, which made Ada instantly famous upon birth. Ada would go on to overcome numerous obstacles to obtain a level of education typically forbidden to women of her day. She would eventually join forces with Charles Babbage, generally credited with inventing the computer, although as Essinger makes clear, Babbage couldn?t have done it without Lovelace. Indeed, Lovelace wrote what is today considered the world?s first computer program?despite opposition that the principles of science were ?beyond the strength of a woman?s physical power of application.? Based on ten years of research and filled with fascinating characters and observations of the period, not to mention numerous illustrations, Essinger tells Ada?s fascinating story in unprecedented detail to absorbing and inspiring effect.

The founder of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama recounts his experiences as a lawyer working to assist those desperately in need, reflecting on his pursuit of the ideal of compassion in American justice.

A book that explores the seemingly magical world of Jackie Onassis' youth, her fairy-tale marriage to a wealthy and handsome senator and presidential candidate and her astonishing transformation into a deft political wife and unique first lady. Also explores what the author asserts was Jackie's 31-year struggle with PTSD after the assassination of her husband, John F. Kennedy.

A portrait of the 15th-century peasant-turned-saint that draws on historical facts, folklore and centuries of critical interpretation to evaluate the questions attributed to her character.

"A collection of Don Morreale's YourHub/Examiner.com articles about the life and times of contemporary Coloradans. He writes about artists, athletes, thinkers, helpers, seekers, travelers, and plain folks with unusual personal histories."--from publisher's description.

The former talk-show host and "New York Times" columnist draws on his extensive career to share reflections and reminiscences about Hollywood legends, American cultural icons, and everyday absurdities.

"Tired of memoirs that only tell you what really happened? Sick of deeply personal accounts written in the first person? Seeking an exciting, interactive read that puts the ?u? back in ?aUtobiography?? Then look no further than Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography! In this revolutionary, Joycean experiment in light celebrity narrative, actor/personality/carbon-based-life-form Neil Patrick Harris lets you, the reader, live his life. You will be born to New Mexico. You will get your big break at an acting camp. You will get into a bizarre confrontation outside a nightclub with actor Scott Caan. Even better, at each critical juncture of your life you will choose how to proceed. You will decide whether to try out for Doogie Howser, M.D. You will decide whether to spend years struggling with your sexuality. You will decide what kind of caviar you want to eat on board Elton John?s yacht. Choose correctly and you?ll find fame, fortune, and true love. Choose incorrectly and you?ll find misery, heartbreak, and a hideous death by piranhas. All this, plus magic tricks, cocktail recipes, embarrassing pictures from your time as a child actor, and even a closing song"--From publisher description.

The actor reminisces about his Hollywood years, tracing his brushes with the law, military service, long-time marriage, and contributions to such films as "Do the Right Thing," "The Godfather, Part II," and "Moonstruck.".

Drawing on interviews, letters, recordings, and police records, an investigative journalist chronicles the life of "Saturday Night Live" star Phil Hartman, focusing especially on the years and moments leading up to the comedian's murder.

The younger half-brother of the forty-fourth president provides a story of life and identity, recounting his relationship with the commander-in-chief, his family's struggle with domestic violence, and his multi-cultural background.

A portrait of the longest-reigning woman pharaoh in Ancient Egypt. Draws on surviving artifacts to consider her unprecedented rise, her achievements, and why most of her monuments were destroyed after her death.

"Amy Jo Burns grew up in Mercury, Pennsylvania, a small, conservative Rust Belt town fallen sleepy a decade after the steel industry's collapse. But the year Amy turned ten, everyone in Mercury woke up. That was the year Howard Lotte, Mercury's beloved piano teacher, was accused of committing indiscretions during his lessons. Among the girls questioned, only seven dared to tell the truth that would ostracize them from the community. Amy Jo Burns was one of the girls who lied. Her memoir, CINDERLAND, navigates the impact that lie had on her adolescent years to follow--tracing all the boys she ran from and toward, the girls she betrayed, and the endless performances she put on to please a town that never trusted girls in the first place"-- Provided by publisher.

The blogger behind the popular Web series Ask a Mortician describes her experiences working at a crematory, including how she sometimes got ashes on her clothes and how she cared for bodies of all shapes and sizes.

"Glenn Beck provides stories of the people who built America and the people who sought to destroy it"-- Provided by publisher.

Zak Ebrahim was only seven years old when, on November 5th, 1990, his father El-Sayyid Nosair shot and killed the leader of the Jewish Defense League. While in prison, Nosair helped plan the bombing of the World Trade Center. Though Ebrahim was subjected to a violent, intolerant ideology throughout his childhood, he did not become radicalized. Ebrahim argues that people conditioned to be terrorists are actually well positioned to combat terrorism, because of their ability to bring seemingly incompatible ideologies together in conversation and advocate in the fight for peace. Ebrahim argues that everyone, regardless of their upbringing or circumstances, can learn to tap into their inherent empathy and embrace tolerance over hatred.

Pages