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New Arrivals - DVDs

A two hour documentary that asks: What do we lose when a language dies? What does it take to save a language? It is filmed around the world: on a remote island off the coast of Australia, where 400 Aboriginal people speak ten different languages, all at risk; in Wales, where Welsh, once in danger, is today making a comeback; and in Hawaii, where a group of Hawaiian activists are fighting to save their native tongue.

Travel through time on a culinary adventure that reveals the humble beginnings and climactic interludes of cuisine throughout the ages to reveal how food has made us who we are today, and how it shapes our future.

Evel. Not a name that will be forgotten. Not a man that will be forgotten. Hell, he wasn't a man, he was a daredevil. Evel was the original daredevil. He left behind a twisted wreck of a life and a story that can only be told at full speed, straight up, and with no flowery prose. Look back, and look inside. With a cast that includes those who were there, those who wanted to be Evel, and those who became who they are today because of one man.

Dr. Lucy Worsley explores the royal wardrobes of our kings and queens over the last 400 years, from Elizabeth I to the present Queen Elizabeth II, explaining how the royal wardrobe is a carefully orchestrated piece of theater managed by the royals themselves to control the right image and project the right message to their subjects. Royal fashion is, and always has been, as much about politics as it is about the cut.

The life of the greater sage-grouse, which lives on the "sagebrush sea" that stretches across 11 states in the American West, is detailed. Other featured creatures include the golden eagle, great-horned owl, cavity-nesting bluebirds and American kestrel.

Renowned as the richest gold strike in North American mining history, the Klondike Gold Rush (1896-1899) set off a stampede of over 100,000 people on a colossal journey from Alaska to the gold fields of Canada's Yukon Territory. The Klondike Gold Rush is an incredible story of determination, luck, fortune, and loss. In the end, it isn't all about the gold, but rather the journey to the Klondike itself.

Takes a stunning new look at our wild planet by turning the cameras around to show the world as it really is, with humans in the picture. Dr. M. Sanjayan journeys to the frontiers of where man and animal meet to discover how our relationship with the greatest natural history events on the planet can provide a key to preserving our present and enriching our future.

Reexamines the Vietnam War and its impact on America through the prism of interviews conducted by the iconic host of The Dick Cavett Show from 1968-75. Those interviews, combined with archival footage, network news broadcasts, and newly filmed interviews with Cavett and other experts, provide fresh insight and perspective on this controversial chapter of American history.

When Louis Ortiz shaved off his goatee one day in 2008, his life changed forever. He looked in the mirror and he didn't see himself, a middle-aged, unemployed Puerto Rican father from the Bronx. He saw the face of change, of hope, of money. Tells the strange and improbable tale of a Barack Obama impersonator who tries to cash in on the "look of a lifetime" and chases a fevered American dream from opportunity to oblivion.

Lucy Worsley gets into bed with the past monarchs to uncover the "Tales from the royal bedchamber". She reveals that the obsession with royal bedrooms, births and succession is nothing new. In fact, the rise and fall of their magnificent beds reflects the changing fortunes of the monarchy itself.

Scientists in the jungles of Northern Sumatra study and document a unique social band of wild orangutans, and provide an intimate, clear picture of how these apes spend their days and nights and interact with each other.

Investigate the reasons North Carolina, long seen as the most progressive state in the South, became home to the largest Klan organization in the country, with more members than all the other Southern states combined, during the 1960s.

The Day the 60s Died chronicles May 1970, the month in which four students were shot dead at Kent State. The mayhem that followed has been called the most divisive moment in American history since the Civil War. From college campuses, to the jungles of Cambodia, to the Nixon White House, The Day the 60s Died takes us back into that turbulent spring 45 years ago.

This tears into the very fiber of the modern day marijuana debate to reveal the truth behind the arguments and motives governing both those who support and oppose the existing pot laws.

Dr. Lustig explains that the problem is the quality and not the quantity of food people eat. The real culprit is processed food, loaded with added sugar and stripped of its natural fiber and nutrients. He is leading the groundswell to expose the high sugar content in processed food, and the dangers and costs to our health.

In the heart of the Antarctic Peninsula there's a unique British post office surrounded by jaw-dropping scenery including 3,000 Gentoo penguins. You will see their four-month drama unfold against the backdrop of their lives primarily, cruise ships with enthusiastic tourists to photograph the penguins, and buy postcards to send to friends and family around the world from the Penguin Post Office.

In less than two minutes in March, a one-square-mile field of debris slammed into the Washington state community of Oso, killing 41 and destroying nearly 50 homes. Drawing on analyses of other recent landslides around the world, geologists are investigating what triggered the deadliest U.S. landslide in decades and whether climate change is increasing the risk of similar disasters around the globe.

Explore the dramatic story behind the making of the film and meet the surviving cast, crew, and locals who participated in the production, many of whose lives mirrored the film's controversial themes of racism and segregation, as they celebrate the film that remains as powerful and relevant today as when it was first released.

Profiles the group of Los Angeles studio musicians known as the Wrecking Crew -- featuring Tommy Tedesco, guitar; Hal Blaine, Earl Palmer drums ; Carol Kaye, Joe Osborne, bass -- who played on a slew of rock and pop hits during the sixties. Gifted, versatile and possessing the knack for turning a simple tune into something memorable, the Wrecking Crew were the players who turned the Wall of Sound in Phil Spector's head into a reality, and helped Brian Wilson create the musical vision that would redefine California pop. The Wrecking Crew also backed up everyone from Sonny and Cher, the Mamas and the Papas and the Monkees to Herb Alpert, Nat King Cole and Frank Sinatra, but while they became legends in the music business, they were all but unknown to the millions of people who made their records some of the biggest hits of the day. Filmmaker Denny Tedesco -- whose father Tommy was a member of the Wrecking Crew and perhaps the most recorded guitarist in history -- brings the free-wheeling story of the most famous musicians you've never heard of to the screen with the documentary The Wrecking Crew, which includes interviews with Cher, Brian Wilson, Nancy Sinatra, Roger McGuinn, Mickey Dolenz, Dick Clark and many more.

In the program, Suze insightfully covers a wide range of topics that will resonate with viewers, including how to invest; whether to buy a home or not; saving for retirement; life insurance; wills and trusts; student loans; and more.

What actually makes owls so special? Bird trainers Lloyd and Rose Buck and their very special family of owls provide a rare opportunity to learn more about these unique birds. Using the latest technology, we can take a brand new look at owls in more detail than ever before. The real stories behind how they hunt, how their vision and hearing works, and how they fly so silently are influencing 21st century technology and design.

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