Home > Books, Movies & Music > New Arrivals > New Arrivals - History

New Arrivals - History

Explores the mythology and legacy of Paris between 1914 and 1918, when romantic young men frequented cafes and drank wine despite the constant threat of invasion by Germany.

"In Grizzlies On My Mind, Michael Leach shares his love for Yellowstone--its landscapes and wildlife, especially its iconic bison and grizzlies--as he tells tales that will delight anyone interested in the national park system, wildlife and wild landscapes, rivers and adventure"--Page [4] of cover.

"Pulitzer Prize-winning author Wallace Stegner tells about a thousand-mile migration marked by hardship and sudden death?but unique in American history for its purpose, discipline, and solidarity"--From publisher description.

"... a fictionalized account of the 369th Infantry Regiment--the first African American regiment mustered to fight in World War I. From the enlistment lines in Harlem to the training camp at Spartanburg, South Carolina, to the trenches in France, ... Max Brooks tells the thrilling story of the heroic journey that these soldiers undertook for a chance to fight for America. Despite extraordinary struggles and discrimination, the 369th became one of the most successful--and least celebrated--regiments of the war. The Harlem Hellfighters, as their enemies named them, spent longer than any other American unit in combat and displayed extraordinary valor on the battlefield"-- Provided by publisher.

The author recalls his seventy-six day ordeal adrift in the Atlantic Ocean in a five foot inflatable raft, after the sinking of his sailboat, recounting his problems surviving the weather, shark attacks, raft leaks, and food and water shortages.

Considers how the world would be different if the United States had never been founded, retelling the story of how the country was born and discussing aspects of American life that make the U.S. exceptional.

A memoir of the author's imprisonment in a women's concentration camp.

An account of a virtually unknown pre-World War II counterespionage operation describes how naturalized German-American agent William G. Sebold became the FBI's first double agent and was a pivotal figure in the arrests of 33 enemy agents for the Nazis.

Tells the inspiring, true story of the Middle East hostage crisis that began in 1979, and of the unconventional means Ross Perot used to save his countrymen.

"A hypnotic journey in the company of one of the world's most acclaimed Egyptologists that tells how the Nile continually brought life to an ancient civilization now dead, and how it sustained its successors, now in tumult"--From publisher description.

A behind-the scenes look at the rivalry between the Obamas and the Clintons reveals the animosity, jealousy, and competition that divides America's two most powerful political couples.

Presents a look at the role of espionage during the American Revolution, chronicling the exploits of a small ring of spies working for George Washington and centered in New York

A naive young man, a radio enthusiast and radio buff, was caught up in the fall of the British Empire at Singapore in 1942. He was put to work on the Railway of Death -- the Japanese line from Thailand and Burma. The most disastrous engineering project in history, it killed 250,000 Allied prisoners and Thai labourers. Lomax helped to build a radio so that he and his comrades could follow news of the war. The radio was discovered and he was brutally tortured. One of his tormentors was a young Japanese interpreter; Lomax never forgot him. Despite an outwardly successful life, Lomax was emotionally ruined by his experiences and could never share them with anyone. Almost fifty years after the war, his life was changed by the discovery that his interrogator, the Japanese interpreter, was still alive. This is the story of a tragic life and a transformed old age.

An account of the Doolittle Raid against Tokyo explores this seminal event in the early stages of World War II, discusses its ramifications in terms of the Allied war effort, and profiles the men who took part in the raid

"In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the 'Sea Peoples' invaded Egypt. The pharaoh's army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this 'First Dark Ages,' Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age--and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece"-- Provided by publisher.

Collects interviews with Marines, soldiers, and sailors who have served in twenty-first-century wars and explores their motivations, dreams, and emotions felt during times of extreme danger.

"Based on years of archival research and interviews with the last surviving aides and Roosevelt family members, Nigel Hamilton offers a definitive account of FDR's masterful--and under appreciated--command of the Allied war effort. Hamilton takes readers inside FDR's White House Oval Study--his personal command center--and into the meetings where he battled with Churchill about strategy and tactics and overrode the near mutinies of his own generals and secretary of war"--Frompublisher description.