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New Arrivals - History

In this history of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, Paul Ham argues against the use of nuclear weapons, drawing on extensive research and hundreds of interviews to show that the bombings had little impact on the eventual outcome of the Pacific War.

The true story of Theodore Roosevelt's harrowing 1914 exploration of one of the most dangerous rivers on earth, a black, uncharted tributary of the Amazon that snakes through one of the most treacherous jungles in the world. Indians armed with poison-tipped arrows haunt its shadows; piranhas glide through its waters; boulder-strewn rapids turn the river into a roiling cauldron. After his humiliating election defeat in 1912, Roosevelt set his sights on the most punishing physical challenge he could find, the first descent of an unmapped tributary of the Amazon. He and his men faced an unbelievable series of hardships, losing their canoes and supplies to punishing whitewater rapids, and enduring starvation, Indian attack, disease, drowning, and a murder within their own ranks. Three men died, and Roosevelt was brought to the brink of suicide. Yet he accomplished a feat so great that many at the time refused to believe it.--From publisher description.

The author recounts her almost two-thousand mile journey across Australia with nothing but a dog and some camels for company.

A day-to-day account of the 1978 Camp David conference, when President Jimmy Carter persuaded Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian president Anwar Sadat to sign the first peace treaty in the modern Middle East, one which endures to this day. With insight into the forces at play in the Middle East, Lawrence Wright takes us through each of the thirteen days of the Camp David conference, delving deeply into the issues and enmities between the two nations, explaining the relevant background to the conflict and to all the major participants at the conference, from the three heads of state to their mostly well-known seconds working furiously behind the scenes.--from publisher's description.

In this history of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, Paul Ham argues against the use of nuclear weapons, drawing on extensive research and hundreds of interviews to show that the bombings had little impact on the eventual outcome of the Pacific War.

"Best Tent Camping: New Mexico is a must-read for campers and adventurers desiring an excursion into the Southwest. New Mexico offers a charm and beauty that is rare. From open Southwestern landscapes with blue mountains visible on the distant horizon to the meadows and streams and pines of Sugarite Canyon State Park in northern New Mexico, and on to White Sands, it is a truly an enchanting journey. This state is full of history, offering ruins and forts from the Spanish-American War, Native American pueblos, archaeology, and cliff dwellings. Camping in New Mexico offers extensive options. Best Tent Camping: New Mexico is an indispensable guide, and the best campgrounds in and around these remarkable areas are described in great detail. In Best Tent Camping: New Mexico, local author Monte Parr details the locations where travelers can best experience New Mexico's incredible beauty. Amenities, price, elevation, restrictions, directions, and GPS coordinates are listed for each campground, and all locations are rated for beauty, privacy, cleanliness, and quiet. "-- Provided by publisher.

Offers the author's account of his Chinese family's flight from oppression in Vietnam, their harrowing experiences as boat people, their subsequent rescue, and the difficulties they faced after being relocated to Fort Smith, Arkansas.

One woman's journey to find the lost love her grandfather left behind when he fled pre-World War II Europe, and an exploration into family identity, myth, and memory.

Before returning to America after spending twenty years in Britain, the author decided to tour his second home and presents a look at England's quirks and its endearing qualities.

Presents a guide to touring national parks and Native American sites in the Four Corners region, and offers a history of the ancestral Puebloans and their habitation in the region from 10,000 BC to the present.

Follows a handful of young Commission for Relief in Belgium (CRB) delegates, a twenty-two-year-old Belgian woman, two U.S. diplomats, the head of the CRB, and a Belgian businessman and a Belgian priest who team up to fight the German occupation.

"A collection of Don Morreale's YourHub/Examiner.com articles about the life and times of contemporary Coloradans. He writes about artists, athletes, thinkers, helpers, seekers, travelers, and plain folks with unusual personal histories."--from publisher's description.

"War corrupts. Endless war corrupts absolutely. Ever since 9/11 America has fought an endless war on terror, seeking enemies everywhere and never promising peace. In 'Pay any price,' James Risen reveals an extraordinary litany of the hidden costs of that war: from squandered and stolen dollars, to outrageous abuses of power, to wars on normalcy, decency, and truth. In the name of fighting terrorism, our government has done things every bit as shameful as its historic wartime abuses -- and until this book, it has worked very hard to cover them up. Lincoln suspended habeas corpus. FDR authorized the internment of thousands of Japanese Americans. Presidents Bush and Obama now must face their own reckoning. Power corrupts, but it is endless war that corrupts absolutely"-- Provided by publisher.

An exploration of the people, places, institutions, and aspirations of those living in and about old East Denver.

Presents an anthology of the best travel writing published in 2014, selected from magazines, newspapers, and web sites.

Describes the conflict in the Colorado Territory which led to the massacre and examines the aftermath.

Learn the inside scoop on Watergate, the Ford Pardon, and the 18 ½ minute Gap. Roger Stone gives us the inside scoop on Nixon's rise and fall in Watergate.

Presents a portrait of the United States during the turbulent political and economic upheavals of the 1970s, covering events ranging from the Arab oil embargo and the era of Patty Hearst to the collapse of the South Vietnamese government and the rise of Ronald Reagan.

Describes the experiences of three women soldiers deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq to reveal how their military service has affected their friendship, personal lives and families, detailing the realities of their work on bases and in war zones and how their choices and losses shaped their perspectives.

On June 14, 1940, German tanks entered a silent and nearly deserted Paris. Eight days later, France accepted a humiliating defeat and foreign occupation. Subsequently, an eerie sense of normalcy settled over the City of Light. Many Parisians keenly adapted themselves to the situation--even allying themselves with their Nazi overlords. 'When Paris went dark' evokes with stunning precision the detail of daily life in a city under occupation, and the brave people who fought against the darkness. Relying on a range of resources--memoirs, diaries, letters, archives, interviews, personal histories, flyers and posters, fiction, photographs, film and historical studies, Rosbottom has forged a book that will forever influence how we understand those dark years in the City of Light.

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