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New Arrivals - History

"A ... history of the Kremlin, and of the centuries of Russian elites who have shaped it--and been shaped by it in turn. The Kremlin is the heart of the Russian state, a fortress whose blood-red walls have witnessed more than eight hundred years of political drama and extraordinary violence. It has been the seat of a priestly monarchy and a worldly church; it has served as a crossroads for diplomacy, trade, and espionage; it has survived earthquakes, devastating fires, and at least three revolutions. Its very name is a byword for enduring power"-- Provided by publisher

Details the story of the Jewish experience, tracing it across three millennia, from their beginnings as an ancient tribal people to the opening of the New World in 1492 to the modern day. A tie-in to the PBS and BBC series The Story of the Jews.

"An all-new harrowing maritime tale of the sinking and rescue efforts surrounding the HMS Bounty--the actual replica used in the 1962 remake of the 1935 classic Mutiny on the Bounty--which sank during Hurricane Sandy with sixteen aboard. On Tuesday, October 24, 2012, Captain Robin Walbridge made the fateful decision to sail the HMS Bounty from New London, Connecticut, to St. Petersburg, Florida. Walbridge was well aware that a hurricane was forecast to come up the Eastern seaboard. He explained to his crew of fifteen that the ship would fare better at sea than at port, and that he thought he could sail "around the hurricane." He told the crew that anyone who did not want to come on the voyage could leave the ship and there would be no hard feelings. No one took the captain up on his offer. Four days into the voyage, superstorm Sandy made an almost direct hit on the Bounty. The vessel's pumps could not keep up with the incoming water and a few hours later, in the dark of night, the ship overturned, sending the crew tumbling into the ocean filled with crashing thirty-foot waves. The Coast Guard launched one of most complex and massive rescues in its history, flying two Jayhawk helicopter crews into the hurricane and lowering rescue swimmers into the raging ocean again and again despite the dangers. Ultimately fourteen crew members were rescued; tragically, two members did not survive. Dripping with suspense and vivid high-stakes drama, Rescue of the Bounty is an unforgettable tale about the brutality of nature and the human will to survive"-- Provided by publisher.

Documents the 1810 to 1813 expedition, financed by millionaire John Jacob Astor and encouraged by Thomas Jefferson, to establish Fort Astoria, a trading post on the Columbia River in the Pacific Northwest

Examines the plight of the Cherokee Indians as they were moved from their homes to Indian reservations in Oklahoma on the "Trail of Tears."

"The compelling story of the hunt for Aribert Heim, whose decades-long flight from justice turned a mid-level SS officer and concentration camp doctor into the most wanted Nazi war criminal in the world. Dr. Aribert Heim worked at the Mauthausen concentration camp for only a few months in 1941 but left a horrifying mark on the memories of survivors. According to their testimony, Heim euthanized patients with injections of gasoline into their hearts. He performed surgeries on otherwise healthy people. Some recalled prisoners' skulls set out on his desk to display perfect sets of teeth. In the chaos of the postwar period, Heim was able to slip away from his dark past and establish himself as a reputable doctor in the resort town of Baden-Baden. He was tall, handsome, a bit of a charmer, and quickly settled down with a wife and children in peace and comfort. But certain rare individuals in Germany were unwilling to let Nazi war criminals go unpunished. Among them was a police investigator named Alfred Aedtner, who turned finding Heim into an overriding obsession; his quest took him across Europe and across decades, and into a close alliance with legendary Nazi hunter Simon Wiesenthal. This is the incredible story of how Aribert Heim evaded capture, living in a working-class neighborhood of Cairo, praying in Arabic, beloved by an adopted Muslim family, while inspiring a manhunt that outlived him by many years. He became the "Eternal Nazi," a symbol of Germany's evolving attitude toward the sins of its past, which finally crested in a desire to see justice done at almost any cost" -- Provided by publisher.

Carol Hoffman recounts his journey to explore the mystery surrounding the decades-old disappearance of Michael C. Rockefeller in New Guinea, which has kept the world and his family guessing since 1961. Tracing Rockefeller's steps, Hoffman uncovers an epic story of adventure, danger, native tribes, and taboo rituals including cannibalism and head hunting.

The explorer and conservationist relives his odyssey exploring the heart of the most biodiversity-rich place on the planet, the Madre de Dios (Mother of God) region of Peru, where the Amazon River begins its massive flow from the Andean mountain cloud forests into the lowland Amazon rainforest.

"Joan DeJean demonstrates that the Parisian model for urban space was in fact invented two centuries earlier, when the first full design for the French capital was implemented. During this period, Paris saw many changes: It became the first city to tear down its fortifications. A large-scale urban plan was created and executed, with organized streets and boulevards, modern bridges, sidewalks, and public parks. Venues opened for urban entertainment, from opera and ballet to another pastime invented in Paris, recreational shopping. Parisians enjoyed the earliest street lighting and public transportation, even as theirs became Europe's first great walking city."--www.Amazon.com.

In graphic novel format, recounts the legendary event from Japanese history in which forty-seven samurai avenged the death of their master before committing ritual suicide.

"The Vietnam War has left a deep and lasting impression in American life, from its impact on the men and women who fought in it, to the journalists and photographers who covered it, to the millions of Americans who protested against it or supported it. Thanks to an uncensored press, the world knew and saw more of this war than any in history before or since. The Associated Press made an unprecedented commitment to reporting the conflict: It gathered an extraordinary group of superb photojournalists in its Saigon bureau, and these men created one of the great photographic legacies of the twentieth century. Collected here are images that tell the human story of the Vietnam War, as we watch the American presence in the war swell from a trickle of military advisers in the late 1950s, through dramatic operations involving thousands of soldiers in the 1960s, to the fall of Saigon in 1975. These are pictures that both recorded and made history, taken by unbelievably courageous photojournalists. In a moving essay, writer Pete Hamill, who reported from Vietnam in 1965, celebrates their achievement, focusing on five masters who took many of the photographs in the book: Horst Faas, Henri Huet, Eddie Adams, Nick Ut, and Phuoc Van Dang. As we begin to look back from the vantage point of half a century, this is the book that will serve as a photographic record of the drama and tragedy of the Vietnam War"-- Provided by publisher.

Justin Hocking lands in New York hopeful but adrift. He's jobless, unexpectedly overwhelmed and disoriented by the city, struggling with anxiety and obsession, and attempting to maintain a faltering long-distance relationship. As a man whose brand of therapy has always been motion, whether in a skate park or on a snowdrift, Hocking needs an outlet for his restlessness. Then he spies his first New York surfer hauling a board to the subway, and it's not long before he's a member of the vibrant and passionate surfing community at Far Rockaway. But in the wake of a traumatic robbery incident, the dark undercurrents of his ocean-obsession pull him further and further out on his own night sea journey.

A history of the Allied bombing campaigns of World War II questions the morality of British and American attacks on occupied European cities while offering insight into the course of the civilian front line of the Allied air war as it was shaped by political strategies.