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New Arrivals - Literature

An insightful drama about one woman's drive and its emotional toll on her and her family. Grandma Kurnitz has endured many crises, ranging from a harsh childhood in Germany to being a young widow with six children in a foreign country. From her life she learned to be strong, hard, and cold, and this is the lesson she tries to instill in her four remaining children. While her two teenage grandsons are in her care, the three learn the importance of being loved and loving, and the difference between living and surviving. The themes of family ties and the search for love should strike a responsive chord with many young adults

"This hilarious yet practical manual written by two comedians tackles the fundamentals of good conversation, offering solid advice and sound social wisdom alongside faux-serious diagrams and inventories of real and humorously implausible scenarios"-- Provided by publisher.

The mother/daughter duo are back with their fourth collection humorous observations.

A retelling of The return of the Jedi in iambic pentameter, the style of Shakespeare. Now Luke Skywalker and his rebel band must seek fresh allies in their quest to thwart construction of a new Imperial Death Star...Frozen heroes, furry creatures, and family secrets revealed! And a light saber duel to decide the fate of the Empire.

"In The Zhivago Affair, Peter Finn and Petra Couvée bring us intimately close to this charming, passionate, and complex artist. First to obtain CIA files providing concrete proof of the agency's involvement, the authors give us a literary thriller that takes us back to a fascinating period of the Cold War--to a time when literature had the power to stir the world."--www.Amazon.com.

In President Me, Carolla shares his vision for a different, better America free from big issues like big government down to small problems like hotel alarm clock placement. Running on an anti narcissism platform, President Carolla calls for a return to the values of an earlier time when stew and casserole were on every dinner table and there were no "service dogs" on airplanes.

Crossing the line : Caitlyn Fox has one chance to prove to her outrageously hot--and ridiculously controlling--boss that she's got the chops to succeed. But Jamison Wolfe isn't quite what he seems. And once they cross the line between business and pleasure, Caitlyn discovers the one place where she's in control... Burned : Trainer and martial artist Rosie Miller's zen is seriously compromised when Hunter Black--her former coach and lover--becomes her new boss. And with all the sexual energy still crackling between them, her poor little zen doesn't stand a chance. So this time, Rosie is determined to play by her rules...

"In the vein of The Creative Habit and The Artist's Way, a new manifesto on the creative process from a master of the impossible. Since well before his epic 1974 walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, Philippe Petit had become an artist who answered first and foremost to the demands of his craft-not only on the high wire, but also as a magician, street juggler, visual artist, builder, and writer. A born rebel like many creative people, he was from an early age a voracious learner who taught himself, cultivating the attitudes, resources, and techniques to tackle even seemingly impossible feats. His outlaw sensibility spawned a unique approach to the creative process-an approach he shares, with characteristic enthusiasm, irreverence, and originality in Creativity: The Perfect Crime. Making the reader his accomplice, Petit reveals new and unconventional ways of going about the artistic endeavor, from generating and shaping ideas to practicing and problem-solving to pulling off the "coup" itself-executing a finished work. The strategies and insights he shares will resonate with performers of every stripe (actors, musicians, dancers) and practitioners of the non-performing arts (painters, writers, sculptors), and also with ordinary mortals in search of fresh ways of tackling the challenges and possibilities of everyday existence"-- Provided by publisher.

Features pairings by twenty-three best-selling suspense writers who in short high-action stories pit their most popular characters against one another.

The last mercenary (c2001): "Micah Steele was a mystery, as silent as stone and just as intractable. Not even those closest to him knew the details of his life--which was exactly how it had to be. Because Micah was a mercenary, and his lies protected those he loved. Or they had, until the young beauty he'd left behind in Jacobsville, Texas, was kidnapped by his sworn enemy. Micah was prepared to go to the ends of the earth to rescue Callie Kirby, but he wasn't prepared for her sweet innocence to be more dangerous than the evil he hunted. He could protect Callie from ruthless drug lords, but who would protect her from Micah?" -- p. [4] of cover.

"A collection of humorous essays about aging by actress and comedian Annabelle Gurwitch"--Provided by publisher

A portrait of nineteenth-century actress Ellen Ternan, the woman who was the mistress of Charles Dickens, describing her secret relationship with the author.

A collection of essays explores empathy, using topics ranging from street violence and incarceration to reality television and literary sentimentality to ask questions about people's understanding of and relationships with others.

Offers poems capturing the life of a soldier, including waiting in the dusty Middle Eastern heat and writing a love letter back home.

"Twenty-one all-original stories, by an all-star list of contributors, will delight and astonish you in equal measure with their cunning twists and dazzling reversals. And George R.R. Martin himself offers a brand-new 'Game of thrones' tale chronicling one of the biggest rogues in the entire Ice and Fire saga"--From publisher description.

"In this new collection of essays that are mostly about the life part, the author writes about e-mail, parenthood, the mental scars that dodgeball can leave, and what she really should have done about a skunk before it thought it owned more of her house than she did. The shrewd insights about everyday escapades--both touching and humorous--are honest, entertaining, and about stuff that we all understand: life, kids, falling down, and the amazing thing about the way it goes."--Cover page [4].

"At twenty-three, after leaving graduate school to pursue her dreams of becoming a poet, Joanna Rakoff moves to New York City and takes a job as assistant to the storied literary agent for J. D. Salinger. She spends her days in a plush, wood-paneled office, where Dictaphones and typewriters still reign and old-time agents doze at their desks after martini lunches. At night she goes home to the tiny, threadbare Williamsburg apartment she shares with her socialist boyfriend. Precariously balanced between glamour and poverty, surrounded by titanic personalities, and struggling to trust her own artistic instinct, Rakoff is tasked with answering Salinger's voluminous fan mail. But as she reads the candid, heart-wrenching letters from his readers around the world, she finds herself unable to type out the agency's decades-old form response. Instead, drawn inexorably into the emotional world of Salinger's devotees, she abandons the template and begins writing back. Over the course of the year, she finds her own voice by acting as Salinger's, on her own dangerous and liberating terms" -- from publisher's web site.