Home > Books, Movies & Music > New Arrivals > New Arrivals - Literature

New Arrivals - Literature

"The unstoppable, irreverent mother-daughter team presents a new collection of funny stories and true confessions that every woman can relate to. From identity theft to the hazards of bicycling to college reunions and eating on the beach, Lisa and Francesca tackle the quirks, absurdities, and wonders of everyday life with wit and warmth. As Lisa says, "More and more, especially in the summertime when I'm sitting on the beach, I'm learning not to sweat it. To go back to the child that I used to be. To see myself through the loving eyes of my parents. To eat on the beach. And not to worry about whether every little thing makes me look fat. In fact, not to worry at all." So put aside your worries and join Lisa and Francesca as they navigate their way through the crazy world we live in, laughing along the way"-- Provided by publisher.

Best-selling suspense novelist Mary Higgins Clark invites you on a tour of Manhattan's most iconic neighborhoods in this anthology of all-new stories from the Mystery Writers of America. From the Flatiron District (Lee Child) and Greenwich Village (Jeffery Deaver) to Little Italy (T. Jefferson Parker) and Chinatown (S.J. Rozan), you'll encounter crimes, mysteries, and riddles large and small. Illustrated with iconic photography of New York City and packaged in a handsome hardcover, Manhattan Mayhem is a delightful read for armchair detectives and armchair travelers alike!

"A memoir of self-discovery and the dilemma of connection in our time, The Odd Woman and the City explores the rhythms, chance encounters, and ever-changing friendships of urban life that forge the sensibility of a fiercely independent woman who has lived out her conflicts, not her fantasies, in a city (New York) that has done the same. Running steadily through the book is Vivian Gornick's exchange of more than twenty years with Leonard, a gay man who is sophisticated about his own unhappiness, whose friendship has "shed more light on the mysterious nature of ordinary human relations than has any other intimacy" she has known. The exchange between Gornick and Leonard acts as a Greek chorus to the main action of the narrator's continual engagement on the street with grocers, derelicts, and doormen; people on the bus, cross-dressers on the corner, and acquaintances by the handful. In Leonard she sees herself reflected plain; out on the street she makes sense of what she sees. Written as a narrative collage that includes meditative pieces on the making of a modern feminist, the role of the flaneur in urban literature, and the evolution of friendship over the past two centuries, The Odd Woman and the City beautifully bookends Gornick's acclaimed Fierce Attachments, in which we first encountered her rich relationship with the ultimate metropolis"-- Provided by publisher.

"Including significant previously uncollected material, My Generation is the definitive gathering of the fruits of this beloved writer's five decades of public life. Here is the William Styron unafraid to peer into the darkest corners of the 20th century or to take on the complex racial legacy of the United States. But here too is Styron writing about his daily walk with his dog, musing on the Modern Library's "100 Greatest Books," and offering personal insight into the extraordinary array of noted contemporary figures he interacted with over the course of an illustrious career. These are the people and events, tragic and joyful, historical and intimate, that aroused Styron's unrivaled curiosity"-- Provided by publisher.

For Arthur Miller's centennial year, The Library of America and editor Tony Kushner present the final volume in the definitive collected edition of the essential American dramatist.

A journalist and lifelong Sherlock Holmes fan explores Arthur Conan Doyle's original tales to reveal how they laid the groundwork for a myth of seemingly infinite variety in literary and screen adaptations.

"My villages is an intricate tapestry of one woman's personal history, radiant with such skillful weavings of language and images, places and times that Campbell evokes the luminosity of not only her world, but of all our own worlds loved and lost"--Back cover.

"I believe Freud got it wrong when he said that the two basic drives that motivate our thoughts and behavior are 1) sex and 2) death, which he sometimes called aggression, go figure. So what runs the show, then? Fear of embarrassment prevails until the age of thirty, followed by the desire to lose weight, and finally, the need to sit down." In LETS BE LESS STUPID, longtime New Yorker staffer and former SNL writer, Patty Marx, employs the weapon she wields best--razor-sharp humor--to tackle what is perhaps the most difficult facet of aging-the decline of the mind. From losing her keys to forgetting her sister-in-law's name, Marx has done it all, and somehow prevailed with friendships in tact. Unrelentingly funny and unexpectedly candid, LET'S BE LESS STUPID speaks to women and men of a certain age, but it will make you laugh at any age. Filled with anecdotes about trying to learn Cherokee, zapping her brain with electricity, taking pills that make her pay attention, and listening to hours of Mozart--all in the service of keeping her mental faculties intact--this is an utterly fresh and original take from one of the smartest comedic writers today. The first woman to be elected to the Harvard Lampoon, Marx is her generation's Nora Ephron"-- Provided by publisher.

"The seven years between the birth of Etgar Keret's son and the death of his father were good years, though still full of reasons to worry. Lev is born in the midst of a terrorist attack. Etgar's father gets cancer. The threat of constant war looms over their home and permeates daily life"--Provided by publisher.