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Recommendations

by: 
Connie, Lakewood Library

In most fairy tales, princesses are beautiful, dragons are terrifying, and stories are harmless.  This isn't most fairy tales.

In the new book, Iron Hearted Violet by Kelly Barnhill, Violet is a princess after my own heart.  She is decidedly NOT considered pretty with her mismatched eyes and unruly hair but she is smart and resourcefuland just may be the key to her kingdom's entire survival!

Violet loves stories, telling them and hearing them.  When the royal storyteller tells a story about a beautiful princess, Violet takes it to heart and begins to see herself as something less.  One day, when she and her best friend, Demetrius, stumble upon a hidden room and find a peculiar book, Violet is drawn into the world of the Nybbas, an evil being that will grant Violet her fondest wish, to be beautiful– if only she will do just one rather small favor for him.

"Iron Hearted Violet is a story of a princess unlike any other.
 It is a story about the power of stories, our belief in them,
 and how one enchanted tale changed the course of an entire kingdom.”

For an unconventional story about an unconventional princess, give Iron Hearted Violet a try!

 

by: 
Diane, Standley Lake Library

Recently, the library received copies of Flora and the Flamingo by Molly Idle.  It's a wonderful story about the trials and joys of friendship as seen through a synchronized dance.  The story is full of humor and heart which left me hoping for more by this author.

It also got me thinking about wordless books.  They are great "reading" for all ages of children, from babies to pre-emergent readers to middle schoolers and even adults!  Using this type of book can enhance the creativity, vocabulary, language development, storytelling, imagination and even writing skills of readers at many stages of development.  Look for them in our catalog under the children's subject heading stories without words

A few other favorites you might want to try are:  Sea of Dreams by Dennis Nolan, The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney and A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka.

by: 
Connie, Lakewood Library

Do you like to read about things that really happened?  Are you interested in true facts?  Then I have a great author for you!

In 1864, the H.L. Hunley was the first submarine ever to sink a ship in battle, but something went terribly wrong.  For reasons still not known, it sank trapping and killing the eight crewmen onboard.  Even though both Conferedate and Union forces searched for it, no one could find the submarine.  The Hunley stayed hidden on the ocean floor for over 130 years.  Finally, in 1995 it was located by archeologists.  Over the next ten years, the submarine was raised and the vessel sifted through to find artifacts and remains of the crew.

This book is a fascinating chronicle of how these scientists finally found some answers to long awaited questions.

If you want to learn more about the Hunley check out this terrific website.

The author, Sally Walker has lots of other great non-fiction books as well.  Take a look at some of these titles;

Blizzard of Glass:  The Halifax Explosion of 1917

Written in Bone: Buried Lives of Jamestown and Colonial Maryland

Frozen Secrets: Antarctica Revealed

She has more books on her website along with an interview with Sally.

If you love real life mysteries, try Sally Walker's books this summer, you'll be glad you did!

by: 
Sheryl, Columbine Library

Just in time for the Fourth of July!

Who wrote the song "Yankee Doodle Went to Town" before the American Revolution?  A patriotic colonist, or an Englishman making fun of those new-fangled Americans? 

Tom Angleberger, the author of the popular Origami Yoda books, gives us a new twist on the song. In Crankee Doodle Yankee Doodle's pony tries to get him to go to town.

by: 
Tisha, Evergreen Library

Whose birthday is today?

Here are some clues:

 - He hates Mondays and loves lasagna
 - He loves coffee and hates raisins
 - He hates to diet and loves to sleep
 - He's orange and furry and was portrayed by a balloon in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade for the first time in 1984
 - His 54th book came out in September, 2012

The answer, of course, is Garfield, who was 'born' on June 19, 1978.

If you love to read the comic strip in the newspaper or online, check out these new books and more from the library, to really get your Garfield fix!

Garfield Gets in a Pickle

My Laughable Life with Garfield

by: 
Rachel, Golden Library

On June 17th, 1885 the Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor.  It was a gift of friendship from the French.  It was created to serve as a tribute to America’s victory over the British in the American Revolution.  The Statue of Liberty was designed by French sculptor Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, who modeled it after his mother!  Here are some other amazing facts about this beautiful American landmark:

-Lady Liberty measures 111 feet, 1 inch from her heels to the top of her head.

-The statue weighs 225 tons or 450,000 pounds.

-In 1885, the statue was shipped from France in 350 individual pieces packed in over 200 containers!

-Her crown has seven spikes, which represent the seven continents and the seven seas.  There are also 25 windows in her crown that people may look out of when visiting.

-The French contributed $250,000 to the making of the Statue of Liberty.  That would be about $5.5 million today.

-When the wind blows at 50 miles per hour or more, the statue sways up to three inches, while the torch bends up to five inches!

-Watch a live streaming view of New York Harbor from the Statue of Liberty’s torch!

Check out some of these books about Lady Liberty from the library:

Lady Liberty: a Biography by Doreen Rappaport

Liberty’s Journey by Kelly DiPucchio

Red, White, Blue, and Uncle Who: The Stories Behind Some of America’s Patriotic Symbols by Teresa Bateman

You Wouldn’t Want to Be a Worker on the Statue of Liberty: A Monument You’d Rather Not Build by John Malam

by: 
Susan, Belmar Library

and he's getting a make-over!!

Check out the new cover for Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone created by artist Kazu Kibuishi, author of Amulet graphic novels.

For 15 years, Harry Potter has been part of the lives of many youth, and adults. The books have been translated into 72 languages.
From The Guardian newspaper, "15 Things The Boy Wizard Is Responsible For", here's a little trivia:

  • Kings Cross is the location of the elusive Platform 9 ¾, gateway to Hogwarts.
  • The first Harry Potter was published by indie publishing house Bloomsbury, upon the demands of the chairman's daughter.
  • Once rejected as irrelevent, Latin is being read, learned and repeated by young readers.
  • The owl market has probably double or triple overnight. Sadly, for some owls, this has meant being abandoned, as they make for stinky pets who are likely to nip.
  • There's a new condition called the "Hogwarts headache", coined by a doctor who described "a tension headache possibly accompanied by neck or wrist pains, caused by unhealthily long reading sessions of Harry Potter."
  • Have you heard the band Harry and The Potters? Yes, this is a real band, yes, they do play gigs. And they continue to tour the US.

For filmdom trivia fans, take a look at Top 15 biggest Harry Potter film mistakes.  If you haven't been to JK Rowling's page, try out the Fun Stuff!

by: 
Connie, Lakewood Library

Are you a Monsters Inc. fan?  Do you love Mike and Sulley?  Have you been waiting for a new Monster movie?  Well your wait is over!

Monsters University opens in theaters nationwide on June 21st!

The library has lots of Monsters University book tie-ins.  Check-out some of the new titles and then check-out the movie trailer:

 

What do you think of the librarian in the school library in the movie trailer?  I don’t know whether to be insulted or flattered but I think she’s kind of awesome!

by: 
Rachel, Golden Library

The sloth is a very unusual, nocturnal mammal that lives in Central and South America.  It is most well-known for being extremely slow-moving.  It spends most of its life upside down in trees.  In fact, the sloth can do most everything upside down from eating and sleeping to mating and giving birth to young.  Sloths also have huge claws which are used for hanging on to branches.  Most sleep fifteen hours per day!  No wonder sloths have earned such a lazy reputation!  Check out these other interesting sloth facts.

-There are five species of sloths.

-A sloth’s teeth are in its cheeks.  It has nine on each side.

-Sloths are excellent swimmers, however they can hardly walk.  Instead they drag themselves along when they need to get around on the ground.

-Sloths can live 10-15 years in the wild and up to 30 in captivity!

-Sloths have a greenish appearance because algae grow in their fur!

-If a sloth’s body temperature becomes too low, bacteria in the stomach prevent it from digesting food and it will starve.

And while you’re at it, don’t delay in taking a look at these fantastic books about sloths available at the library!  Hurry and check one out today.  (P.S. You’ll have to move faster than a sloth).

Baby Sloth by Aubrey Lang

A Little Book of Sloth by Lucy Cooke

Score One For the Sloths by Helen Lester

“Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,” Said the Sloth by Eric Carle

The Very Sleepy Sloth by Andrew Murray

by: 
Kristin, Columbine Library

Have any picky eaters in your family?  They'll love Martha, who doesn't like green beans and thinks they are bad, bad, bad. 

Turns out, she's right!  A gang of green beans march into her house one night and kidnap her parents.  Martha is left by herself to eat all the cookies she wants and stay up late watching movies--- paradise!  But, is it? 

Read How Martha Saved Her Parents from Green Beans by David LaRochelle and see how she saves them.  Your picky eater might giggle the next time you serve beans!

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