Golden Library closed for remodel Mar. 20 - Jun. 11. - Remodel Updates

Home > Kids > Jcpl Kids Blog > Storytimes

Storytimes

by: 
Karen, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

If you have been following my last three blogs, you may already be engaging your little one with a second language! But, what happens when you get stuck on a phrase or cannot pronounce a word in another language?  Do you give up?  

One of the things I found myself doing in the past was holding back because I was afraid to make mistakes. I learned from many people whose second language is English to just let go and try. So, I make a mistake. Who cares?

I have Spanish speaking friends who sometimes misuse a phrase or mispronounce a word in English.  Does that stop us from talking?  No way!  It becomes a teachable moment between us.  I might teach the correct phrase or pronunciation and they might share a way to express that phrase or word in Spanish.  And vice versa when I make an error.  Let's face it, no one can be a true master of any language, including his or her own native language.  For example, do I know every medical term known to my physician? Even more, I am learning new technology terms and phrases from our Digital Experience team all the time.  Talk about another language!  All I can do is keep learning and trying.

Still edgy about pronouncing words in another language?  Try uniteforliteracy.com. There are 100 digital or ebooks created right here in Colorado.  The books have been translated into over 20 different languages. Let the books do the reading for you! The best part is, because the books were locally designed, the topics are relevant to your child and his or her daily experiences.  There is even one called 'Who lives at the Denver Zoo?'

And never forget our own library.  Check out audiobooks in Spanish:

And find a few titles on Hoopla:

Mistakes?  Errores? Don't give up! Carry on mis amigos, carry on...

Photo credit: flickr 

 

by: 
Jill J., Outreach Kids & Families

My son loves monsters. We have monster puppets, monster books, monster toys, shirts with wacky monster designs, monster socks etc. These are goofy, silly, harmless monsters. Sometimes at night, however, he is afraid of the scarier kind of monsters. Recently, he had a couple of nights where he was afraid there was a monster under his bed. So, I was inspired to track down some books and ideas to help him battle his nighttime monsters. I discovered a fantastic book called:

 Big Bad Bubble by Adam Rubin

This book is hilarious AND it makes scary monsters look totally silly! These monsters are actually terrified of tiny, harmless bubbles! This book really helped my son to laugh at these silly monsters and it made him feel brave, too. 

Extend the storytime experience by blowing bubbles after reading the story. This way, your child can show how brave they are by popping the bubbles eagerly. They aren't afraid of bubbles like those super silly monsters are! Also, take a look on Pinterest to find fun ideas and recipes for making a "monster repellent" or "monster spray" to let your child use in their room. You could also ask your child to use washable markers to draw a picture of a scary monster. Tape the drawing up outside. Hand your child a squirt bottle full of water and let your child "wash" away the scary monster!

Image Credit

by: 
Jill J., Outreach Kids & Families

Make some noise!!!!

Making silly sounds for storytime is fuuuuun! More importantly, hearing a variety of sounds and noises helps a child develop the ability to hear the sounds that make up words in spoken language.

Otherwise known as phonological awarenss, this ability is one of the foundations of developing early literacy in infants and young children. Plus, the more engaged, excited and silly you are with your sounds the more your child will enjoy the story!

Here are some great books that give you as the storyteller an excellent opportunity to give your vocal cords a good workout, get silly and boost your child's early literacy skills:

Trains Go By Steve Light

Planes Go By Steve Light

Diggers Go By Steve Light

The Book with No Pictures By B.J. Novak

And now, to show how fun phonological awareness can be, I will end with one of my all time favorite silly songs: Apples and Bananas!

Sing with me!

 

by: 
Karen, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

Why yes, I do have manners, gracias.  

A great approach to find out more about other languages and cultures is learning about greetings and customs. What better way to incorporate a second language into your day than to learn to say 'hello' and 'goodbye' or 'please' and 'thank you' in another language? 

When I was a teacher, I got into the habit and still say 'yes, please' in daily interactions.  I had to model what I wanted to teach my students.  Once the students got some manners down in English, I would start to incorporate other languages into our day. They loved it and would surprise me by saying 'sí, por favor' and 'no, gracias' during meal times.  After I subbed at the 'Había Una Vez' bilingual story time at Belmar Library, I was delighted by the children whose parents encouraged them to personally thank me in Spanish!

Here is a link to digital dialects.  On it, you will encounter 70 different language games. When you click on the language you would like to practice, the following page has several learning topics. The first learning topic is 'phrases and greetings'.  Languages like Spanish, French and Chinese have an audio learning feature.  First, you practice the phrases and then you can play the matching game. 

Check out books about baby sign or American Sign Language (ASL) like this one by Sara Bingham at the library.

Or, try 21 word or phrase signs to practice with your child, courtesy of parenting.com.  

And, my newest discovery!  'El Perro y El Gato' from HBO Latino!  Look for these funny, yet educational videos about a cartoon cat and dog practicing Spanish on youtube.  The following video is about 'manners' or 'modales'.  


Signing 'thank you'?  Saying it in Chinese?  Have fun and use the words right along with your child!

¡Buen día!  Have a great day!

 

Photo credit: flickr.com

 

by: 
Jill J.

Singing plays a vital role in a child's early reading skills. Our friends at Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy tell us that:

  • Singing helps children learn new words.
  • Singing slows down language so that children can hear the different sounds in words and learn about syllables.
  • Singing together is a fun bonding experience with your child — whether you're a good singer or not!
  • Singing develops listening and memory skills and makes repetition easier for young children — it's easier to remember a short song than a short story.
  • Movement gets the oxygen to flowing to those young brain and allows for a nice break to “Shake your sillies out.”

Pete the Cat is always a big hit with kids but why not try some other books that feature a sing-a-long song and picture book all wrapped up in one?  

Give these books a try:

Let's Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy by Jan Thomas  

Bubble Gum, Bubble Gum by Lisa Wheeler

The Croaky Pokey by Ethan Long  

 

Photo credit: dok1 on Flickr

by: 
Robyn Lupa

As readers of this blog already know, sharing books with very young children is important. The simple act of reading aloud to them, consistently, builds their language and socio-emotional skills. Children who enter kindergarten with these skills in place are most likely to thrive.

Last summer, The American Academy of Pediatrics, partnering with Reach Out and Read, began encouraging parents to read, talk, and sing during early childhood checkups. The project was profiled in a New York Times article:

“With the increased recognition that an important part of brain development occurs within the first three years of a child’s life, and that reading to children enhances vocabulary and other important communication skills, the group, which represents 62,000 pediatricians across the country, is asking its members to become powerful advocates for reading aloud, every time a baby visits the doctor.”

This strong endorsement of reading backs up a lot of what we do at the library every day. It's precisely why we invite parents and caregivers to baby and toddler storytimes. Library staff carefully plan 15-20 minute sessions with a blend of books that are just right for the age group with songs, activities, and opportunities to move.

Not only do the kids soak up the experience, but adults also participate in the rhymes and bounces. Storytimes give them a chance to do some bonding and to learn fun things to try at home. Afterward is play time and a chance for babies--and grown-ups--to make new friends. 

Check out the latest storytime schedule to find storytimes for babies and toddlers at all of our libraries. 

 

Photo credit: "I'm Dr. Miu" by Aikawa Ke on Flickr

by: 
Karen, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

As a bilingual English/Spanish librarian, I often hear from adults that they studied Spanish in high school, but they remember very little from those days. It makes perfect sense when you look at brain development.  When babies are born, about 15% of their brains have developed.  By the time a child is 3, 85% of the brain has developed.

Researchers have found that by 6 months old, babies are already showing a preference for a certain language.  Baby brains are wiring to the rhythms and sounds they hear from their families, caregivers and community.  More studies go on to say that the best window of opportunity to learn a second (or third, or fourth...) language is between 0-7 years old.    

Learning another language by the time we reach middle or high school can be too late!

Our corpus collosums (the part of the brain that connects the left and right side of the brain) grow harder as we age.  Connections from one side to the other are no longer as quick as they are in young children when the corpus collosum is soft and malleable.  Learning new things becomes more difficult. And, as we get older, we learn more and more information.  Our brain starts pruning away at unused information.  Ever hear the phrase 'Use it or lose it'?  That's what our brain is constantly doing; trimming away at what it doesn't see as useful to us any more. 

So why teach a child another language?  For one, it has amazing affects on learning new concepts and problem solving!  People who know more than one language can quite literally think 'outside the box' more readily than a monolingual or one language speaker.  That's because they already think in different languages or in more than one way!

Also, younger learners can learn how to produce the native sounds of another language much easier than older learners.  Think of the early wiring to language sounds as babies and the pruning the brain does as we age.  When we are young, the brain is activated to learn as much as it can, including how to form sounds with our mouths and tongues.  For example, as children, if we don't have an experience rolling an 'rrrr' (I used to mimic my cat's purring), we will have a difficult time later in life trying to learn how to do it. The brain is more open to learning how to produce sounds during the early years or this critical period in its development.  Wow! As a former preschool teacher, this stuff facinates me!  

Here's an easy book in English and Spanish with bright pictures of familiar foods to check out:

Over the next few months, I will be exploring more about second language learning and sharing ideas on teaching your child another language---even if you don't know another language yourself!  

If you're looking for ideas or want to get started right away, come to Bilingual (English/Spanish) story times or ASL (American Sign Language) story times at Belmar Library!

 

Carrot photo credit: www.alternativa-verde.com

 

 

by: 
Barbara, Evergreen Library

Five little pumpkins sitting on a gate

The first one said, "I just can't wait."

The second one said, "I'll be there."

The third one said, "If you dare."

The fourth one said "Let's run, let's run!"

The fifth one said, "Isn't Halloween fun!"

Woooooo went the wind...

and the pumpkins made merry,

as they rolled on over to their local LIBRARY...

Join us for Halloween Storytimes and Events from October 16th through November 1st! Your local library will be celebrating Halloween with a ton of fun programs! We hope to see you there, in costume!!

HAPPY HAUNTING!!!

by: 
Marcy, Arvada Library

You have probably heard this before. I have, and yet it still blows my mind.

By age three your child's brain is 80% developed...90% by age five.

Interacting with your baby/toddler/preschooler daily has a huge impact on their early learning and language development. At our libraries we offer you a fun tool to make these times of learning and bonding even better.

Our free literacy calendars offer facts that motivate and activities that inspire. We have calendars for babies, toddlers and preschoolers that will guide you through the month. You will find out about materials and programs we have to support you during this stage in development.

For instance, did you know we have kits with picture books and CD's so your preschooler can "read" along? Did you know that all of our locations offer fun story times for babies and toddlers? (Actually, they are really fun for the caregiver as well!) You will also find buget friendly ideas for creative play like using a muffin tin and different sized balls to make an easy shape sorter for your baby. Or, try taking your preschooler on a "rhyming words" walk where you point out things around the house or neighborhood that rhyme, red/bed, dog/log?

Enjoy a few minutes of meaningful play every day with your beautiful baby...and grow that beautiful brain!

by: 
Jennifer, Lakewood Library

March 2nd is Read Across America Day in honor of Dr. Seuss's birthday. This event was created by the National Education Association to encourage communities to come together to celebrate reading. Libraries and schools all across the country will be celebrating. Check out some of the special events happening at your local library.

Evergreen Library will have a special storytime on Saturday, March 1st at 10:30 a.m. We will sing, read and maybe even dance a little to celebrate Read Across America.

Standley Lake Library will have Dr. Seuss crafts starting Saturday, March 1st and will continue to have them available while supplies last.

Belmar Library will have a special Dr. Seuss storytime on Sunday, March 2nd at 2p.m. Noodles & Company will be providing treats.

Lakewood Library will have a special Dr. Seuss Night on Thursday, March 6th at 6:30 p.m. Join us for a puppet show followed by crafts and cake to celebrate.

 

 

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Storytimes