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Teachers

by: 
Jill Hinn, Outreach Librarian Kids & Families

Now that all the craziness of the holidays is over, you might have the January blahs. It's cold and snowy, and some days gray, and there's not much going on. One way to beat the January blues is to help someone else out.

Ever notice how doing something kind for someone else can make you feel good? Show your kids how to do that and the rewards are endless: You get to spend quality time with your kids while teaching them the values that are important to you. Somebody gets helped. Depending on where you're helping, important conversations about how the world works and what their place in it is could come up.

There are many ways that you and your children can get involved in your community and I'll give you a few ideas to get you started:

  • Now that everybody has new toys, how about cleaning out some of the old stuff and donating what is in good condition to an organization that will put it to good use? Both Arapahoe and Jefferson counties have Santa Shops that low income families can shop at for free in December. Contact them and see if they take donations all year round.
  • It can be hard to find an organization that will accept children as volunteers due to liability/insurance issues. However, you are interested in doing something for a charitable or local institution:
    1. The Action Center (formerly known as The Jeffco Action Center) will accept kids to do certain tasks, such as sorting food. They also have ideas on their website if you're interested creating your own project.
    2.  Feed My Starving Children is a "non-profit Christian organization committed to feeding God’s children hungry in body and spirit. The approach is simple: children and adults hand-pack meals specifically formulated for malnourished children, and we ship these meals to nearly 70 countries around the world." To join a packing session here in Colorado, you need to find a MobilePack event to join--or if you're really ambitious, set up your own! Our family did this and we felt we did something meaningful and useful and found it very rewarding.
    3. Why not call a nursing home near you and see if they have any need for visitors?
    4. Next time it snows, grab your shovels and help out a neighbor or two, especially if you know of someone who might have a hard time shoveling themselves. Make their day!

Want to start a bit smaller? Check out this book

It's fun to read; read it with your kids and pick one or two--or all!--to do together.

Whatever you choose to do, big or small, the important thing is that you are showing your kids that they matter--to you, most importantly, and to the world at large. Show them that what they do can have an impact on the world they live in. And everybody wins.

Photo Credit: Jill Hinn

by: 
Jenny, Golden Library

WHERE:

Denver Museum of Nature and Science Discovery Zone

2001 Colorado Blvd

Denver CO 80205

303-370-6000  

WHEN:

Open (nearly) Every Day 

9am-5pm  

Closed Christmas Day

HOW MUCH:

Museum Admission

Adult (19-64): $14.95

Junior (3-18): $9.95

Senior (65+): $11.95

Family Membership: $90/year*

 

I know, barely 2 posts in and I've already gone a little off-message.

No, the Museum isn't in Jeffco, and it's also not super budget-friendly, but I am so impressed by what they're doing for kids over there, I had to share it with you!

The Museum is a big part of my elementary-school memories (remember when it was the Natural History Museum? Me too). I went to a Denver Public elementary school and lived near City Park. In high school, my Biology 2 class went on the very best and most educational field trip ever to the zoo and Museum. I learned a TON and had more fun than I thought possible while doing such a challenging assignment. (Thanks, Mr. Fredell!) I love the Museum and was really excited to share it with my kids. Maybe over-excited. 

We bought a membership and took the kids in 2012. Unfortunately, Big Brother (then 3) and Little Sister (then baby) didn't think the Museum was as awesome as I do. To be fair, Little Sister would've happily gone wherever we liked, as she was in a carrier and didn't have a choice. Big Brother was content to spend All Day Long in the Space Odyssey exhibit: putting on space suits, piloting the shuttle and playing with "moon rocks."

I was eventually able to coax him into the Prehistoric Journey, but he tore through it at break-neck pace and seemed a bit underwhelmed that the dinosaurs were mostly bones (we tried to prepare him, but 3 isn't a great age for listening - am I right?) We took him on a forced march of the Gems & Minerals (my favorite) before going back to Space Odyssey. On the way home, we reluctantly admitted that perhaps we'd tried to make the museum happen a bit too early for our intended audience. 

Fear not, dear readers, the Museum had a master plan for families like mine and it is the Discovery Zone. This space is intended especially for 3 to 5 year-olds, but includes activities for younger and older siblings. On Level 2, it's set about as far away from the front entrance as it could be and still be in the same building. This seems like bad planning at first, then you realize that there are acres and acres of stroller parking just outside the exhibit. It's genius. 

Oh, where to begin? There's a sand pit to dig for dinosaur bones and other fossils. They've even thoughtfully included a dino to climb on. There's a waterworks, where kids can get elbow-deep and splashy while learning about currents, surface-tension and density. The construction corner has blocks of varying shapes and materials, as well as a magnetic wall where kids manipulate tubes and bumpers to create a vertical ball-maze. The Science Kitchen features puzzles and art projects (and is home to the exhibit's Family Restroom).

We arrived about halfway through a well-attended production at the Explorer's Clubhouse, which we decided not to try to squeeze into, but it looked super fun. We also did not explore the Big Backyard, but it is perfectly charming and the parents and tots in the space seemed quite content. 

Big Brother is 5 now. Like the boy in the photo above, he was compelled to climb on the dinosaur first thing, and couldn't resist the lure on the way out, either. He enjoyed digging for fossils, but had to be reprimanded for flinging "sand" too enthusiastically. Little Sister is almost 3 and she spent most of her time in the Construction Corner. We built a monster and we built a road with the blue foam blocks.

The Water Way was a big hit with Big Brother, but too crowded for Little Sister. They do provide these thick, dentist-x-ray-type smocks, but the kids will come away damp (and happy). Both kids made straw sculptures at the moon table in the Science Kitchen.

I say this in the most delighted way possible, but it's really almost too much for one visit. When we come back, I hope Little Sister will try the Water Way. I hope we can get to another of the art tables in the Kitchen. I hope we can build a vertical maze from scratch without impacting anyone else too much. 

While the Discovery Zone alone is practically enough to fill a day, I also noticed other little things the Museum is doing for its smallest visitors. In the Wildlife Exhibits, there are more manipulatives than I remember. We found some 12x12 picture blocks to build and knock down, alpacas to arrange by size, a python to test your strength - and that was just while we tried to find a short-cut to Whales!  

We didn't see everything we wanted to see this visit. We didn't do everything we wanted to do. But we were able to say, in all confidence, "Next time, we'll be back very soon!"

* We renewed our Family Membership in late November to take advantage of a 30% discount. Also, keep an eye out for Free Days.

 

Photo credit: Denver Museum of Nature and Science

by: 
Karen, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

Ever notice when you hear someone speak another language how different not only the words sound, but how different the rhythm is?  Music is great for learning our native language rhythms and also for exposing your child to another language. Singing songs slows down the words.  Each sound is more emphasized. Music also triggers our memory. I find it funny I can't find my keys half the time, but I can still remember all the words to "Frère Jacques" at any given moment!  

A great website to check out is www.storyblocks.org.  On it you'll find videos of songs and rhymes in 3 languages to try with your little ones: English, Vietnamese and Spanish. The songs and rhymes are taught by local parents and librarians! I love the video with our very own librarian, Cecilia, singing in Spanish 'Dos Manitas, Diez Deditos' or 'Two little hands, Ten Little Fingers'. The words are also transcribed just below and to the right of  the video.  I recently sang this song during a guest baby time appearance at the Evergreen library.  I was impressed by the mamas who learned it along with their babies!  

An easy song to learn body parts is 'Head, Shoulders, Knees and Toes'. I have written it out in Spanish:  

Cabeza (Ka bay za)  Head 
Hombros (Ohm bros) Shoulders
Rodillas (Row dee ahs) Knees
Pies (Peeyays) Feet
Rodillas 
Pies 
Cabeza, Hombros, Rodillas, Pies, Rodillas, Pies

Ojos (O hos)  Eyes
Orejas (Or ay hahs) Ears
Boca (Bo Ka) Mouth
Y Nariz (EE Na Rees) Nose  Y= 'and'
Cabeza, Hombros, Rodillas, Pies, Rodillas, Pies

Not ready to sing a song in another language?  Never fear!  There are CD's and You Tube videos out there to do the singing for you!  For example, when I was teaching, I really liked playing Hap Palmer songs. On 'Learning in two Languages/Aprendiendo en dos idiomas', he sings each song in English and Spanish.  He sings very clearly and you can find his lyrics written out online.

Here is a link to a lovely YouTube video by Natasha Morgan.  It is simply animated and shows her hand drawing animals while she sings and writes out greetings as well as counts numbers up to 12 in French and English.   

 

Adiós, Au Revoir and Goodbye for now!

 

Image credit: flickr

 

by: 
Barbara, Evergreen Library

LETTER KNOWLEDGE: Knowing that letters are different from each other, knowing letter names and sounds, and recognizing letters everywhere. 

BIG A

little a

What begins with A?

Oooh, oooh...I know, I know!!!

I can also tell you what begins with BIG B, little b, BIG C, and little c...

I have Dr. Seuss to thank for this pithy little saying sticking with me all these years, and that is how simple creating letter recognition is with your child. Repetition, rhyme and enjoyment go a very long way in developing your child's interest in letters.

According to The Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy (CLeL), that's why ECRR (Every Child Ready to Read) highlights LETTER KNOWLEDGE as one of their 6 early literacy skills designed to promote early literacy in young children.

Why Is It Important?

To read words, children have to understand that a word is made up of individual letters.

What Can You Do to Help Build This Skill?

  • Look at and talk about different shapes (letters are based on shapes).

  • Play “same and different” type games.

  • Look at “I Spy” type books.

  • Notice different types of letters (“a” or “A”) on signs and in books.

  • Read ABC books.

  • Talk about and draw the letters of a child's own name.

BIG A

little a

What begins with A?

Aunt Annie's alligator...A...a...A.

Oh, sweeter words have never been said!

by: 
Jill J.

Singing plays a vital role in a child's early reading skills. Our friends at Colorado Libraries for Early Literacy tell us that:

  • Singing helps children learn new words.
  • Singing slows down language so that children can hear the different sounds in words and learn about syllables.
  • Singing together is a fun bonding experience with your child — whether you're a good singer or not!
  • Singing develops listening and memory skills and makes repetition easier for young children — it's easier to remember a short song than a short story.
  • Movement gets the oxygen to flowing to those young brain and allows for a nice break to “Shake your sillies out.”

Pete the Cat is always a big hit with kids but why not try some other books that feature a sing-a-long song and picture book all wrapped up in one?  

Give these books a try:

Let's Sing a Lullaby with the Brave Cowboy by Jan Thomas  

Bubble Gum, Bubble Gum by Lisa Wheeler

The Croaky Pokey by Ethan Long  

 

Photo credit: dok1 on Flickr

by: 
Jill Hinn, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

Last week I saw on the news that families were spending less time together over the holiday due to time spent shopping, among other things. This year, why not take some time out from the hustle and bustle to craft great gifts with your kids? The benefits are numerous. First, you're creating connections with your children. You are creating a special time when they can be the focus--who knows what kind of great conversations you might have! Second, you're making something to give to someone. What better way to tell someone you love them than with a gift you've made? Third, depending on the craft you pick, you might be saving yourself some money!        

You're not crafty, you say? Never fear, help is here! There are many resources out there for you; you just have to be able to follow directions. And I know you can do that! Start at the library. There are a multitude of books about making crafts. Here are a few about making presents specifically: 

You can always check out some library events too. You never know when we might have a program about a craft!

Pinterest is another excellent place to get ideas. Pins generally have links back to more detailed instructions. You'll be surprised at the variety and number of options there are when you search Pinterest for "christmas gift crafts for kids." 

You can also go to one of the big craft stores and buy kits that are all ready to put together. Remember, the idea is for you to spend some quality time with your child(ren), not to stress out about how to make something.

These are some of my favorites:          

  • Slow Cooker Cinnamon Almonds - these are easy to do, even the smallest helper can pour sugar and stir and then when they're done, help put them into decorative bags or boxes to gift. The people we gave them out to last year loved them, so we'll be doing them again this year.  
  • Ceramic Tile Coasters are one of my favorite crafts to make with kids. They are cheap and there are so many ways to decorate them that you can really tailor your design to different people. Color them with sharpies, paint your kid's hand and immortalize their handprint on one, glue a picture or a favorite team sports logo on them, the choice is yours. Here is one quick and easy tutorial.
  • Ornaments are always a go-to at this time of year, too, and there are so many fun ideas floating around the web, you should easily be able to find one that fits your time, ability, and budget. How about this cute Cupcake Liner Christmas Tree

Here's wishing you a holiday season full of joy, good cheer, time spent with loved ones, and maybe, a little crafting.

by: 
Karen, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

As a bilingual English/Spanish librarian, I often hear from adults that they studied Spanish in high school, but they remember very little from those days. It makes perfect sense when you look at brain development.  When babies are born, about 15% of their brains have developed.  By the time a child is 3, 85% of the brain has developed.

Researchers have found that by 6 months old, babies are already showing a preference for a certain language.  Baby brains are wiring to the rhythms and sounds they hear from their families, caregivers and community.  More studies go on to say that the best window of opportunity to learn a second (or third, or fourth...) language is between 0-7 years old.    

Learning another language by the time we reach middle or high school can be too late!

Our corpus collosums (the part of the brain that connects the left and right side of the brain) grow harder as we age.  Connections from one side to the other are no longer as quick as they are in young children when the corpus collosum is soft and malleable.  Learning new things becomes more difficult. And, as we get older, we learn more and more information.  Our brain starts pruning away at unused information.  Ever hear the phrase 'Use it or lose it'?  That's what our brain is constantly doing; trimming away at what it doesn't see as useful to us any more. 

So why teach a child another language?  For one, it has amazing affects on learning new concepts and problem solving!  People who know more than one language can quite literally think 'outside the box' more readily than a monolingual or one language speaker.  That's because they already think in different languages or in more than one way!

Also, younger learners can learn how to produce the native sounds of another language much easier than older learners.  Think of the early wiring to language sounds as babies and the pruning the brain does as we age.  When we are young, the brain is activated to learn as much as it can, including how to form sounds with our mouths and tongues.  For example, as children, if we don't have an experience rolling an 'rrrr' (I used to mimic my cat's purring), we will have a difficult time later in life trying to learn how to do it. The brain is more open to learning how to produce sounds during the early years or this critical period in its development.  Wow! As a former preschool teacher, this stuff facinates me!  

Here's an easy book in English and Spanish with bright pictures of familiar foods to check out:

Over the next few months, I will be exploring more about second language learning and sharing ideas on teaching your child another language---even if you don't know another language yourself!  

If you're looking for ideas or want to get started right away, come to Bilingual (English/Spanish) story times or ASL (American Sign Language) story times at Belmar Library!

 

Carrot photo credit: www.alternativa-verde.com

 

 

by: 
Barbara, Evergreen Library

HEY...LEGO my EGGO!

I'm starving and if you think you can just waltz in here and grab my Eggo when I have been waiting so patiently for the toaster to pop...you've got another thing coming buddy!

What? This isn't about my Eggo?

You said LEGO? As in the building blocks?

Oh, well that makes more sense...

So, no Eggo's at the library? Just LEGO's at the library? That could be fun!

LEGO Club has made a huge splash at your local Jefferson County Library, offering monthly programs for both kids and teens. All you need is a little imagination and some elbow grease, and we'll provide the rest.

Now back to my Eggo...where'd I put the syrup?

 

by: 
Barbara, Evergreen Library

Have you ever read a goosebumps book? Not the Goosebumps series by R.L. Stine. I mean a book that no matter how many times you read or re-read it, it gives you goosebumps. WONDER by R.J. Palacio is one of those books!!

August Pullman was born with a facial deformity that, up until now, has prevented him from going to a mainstream school. Starting 5th grade at Beecher Prep, he wants nothing more than to be treated as an ordinary kid—but his new classmates can’t get past Auggie’s extraordinary face.

WONDER, begins from Auggie’s point of view, but soon switches to include his classmates, his sister, her boyfriend, and others. These perspectives converge in a portrait of one community’s struggle with empathy, compassion, and acceptance. 

The magic of Wonder continues in these beautifully written companion books.

365 Days of Wonder by R.J. Palacio

This companion book features conversations between Mr. Browne and Auggie, Julian, Summer, Jack Will, and others, giving readers a special peek at their lives after Wonder ends. Mr. Browne's essays and correspondence are rounded out by a precept for each day of the year—drawn from popular songs to children’s books to inscriptions on Egyptian tombstones to fortune cookies. His selections celebrate the goodness of human beings, the strength of people’s hearts, and the power of people’s wills.
 
There’s something for everyone here, with words of wisdom from such noteworthy people as Anne Frank, Martin Luther King Jr., Confucius, Goethe, Sappho—and over 100 readers of Wonder who sent R. J. Palacio their own precepts.

The Julian Chapter: A Wonder Story by R.J. Palacio

Now readers will have a chance to hear from the book's most controversial character—Julian.

From the very first day Auggie and Julian met in the pages of the Wonder, it was clear they were never going to be friends, with Julian treating Auggie like he had the plague. And while Wonder told Auggie's story through six different viewpoints, Julian's perspective was never shared. Readers could only guess what he was thinking. Until now. The Julian Chapter will finally reveal the bully's side of the story. Why is Julian so unkind to Auggie? And does he have a chance for redemption?

CHOOSE KIND! It'll give you goosebumps!

 

 

by: 
Jennifer, Lakewood Library

Halloween is just hours away. Do you need some last minute decorations? Try these easy upcycle crafts that are great for kids.

Gather up your old jars and some paints to make this colorful Halloween luminaries.

 These cute egg carton spiders are great for toddlers and older kids to make. If you don't have pipe cleaners or wiggle eyes on hand, try using black paper strips for the legs and paste on your own paper eyes.

Wondering what to do with the empty toilet paper rolls from your mummy costume? Your little one will have lots of fun making these toilet paper roll pumpkins.

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