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JCPL Kids

by: 
Sarah, Arvada Library

The weather outside may be frightful, but here at JCPL we are thinking about summer and Kids Summer Reading Club!

Children and families can pre-register for our Dig Into Reading Kids Summer Reading Club in the month of May. Get a head start on summer and beat the lineups by registering online!

Summer Reading Club begins June 1st. This year we will be playing bingo! Pick up your bingo card at any branch, complete your first bingo and come in to the library to pick up your free book. We will also have some other fantastic prizes like passes to Lakeside Amusement Park and a drawing for a Kindle.

Teens and Adults can also sign up for their Summer Reading programs at http://jeffcolibrary.org/summerreading.

by: 
Rachel, Golden Library

The Hindenburg was the world’s largest airship, built in Germany in 1931. The airship as a type of travel and transport came to be used earlier, around 1900. Airships were also used throughout World War II to carry heavy loads long distances and to spy on enemy armies and navies.  In Germany, some airships dropped bombs on London and other locations. Their main purpose was to carry goods and passengers across the Atlantic Ocean, however.

Many airships had light, metal, oval skeletons that made up their interior structures. Airships were filled with gases like helium or hydrogen which are lighter than air, making it possible for them to fly. The Hindenburg was filled with hydrogen and was 804 feet long-longer than two-and-a- half football fields! It would be taller than the Washington Monument if stood on its end!

It was important to keep weight carried on an airship to a minimum, since they needed to float easily. For this reason, furniture for passengers was made of aluminum and sinks were made of plastic. On most flights, passengers could play an aluminum piano, though there wasn’t one on the Hindenburg’s flight.

On the evening of May 6, 1937 the Hindenburg was getting ready to land in Lakehurst, New Jersey. It had taken off from Frankfurt, Germany. This journey took two-and-a-half days. As it descended, a fire began in the back of the airship and soon flames engulfed the whole thing. Thirty-six people died in the crash and 62 survived.

The cause of the Hindenburg explosion is still not known. Some speculate that the fire fueled by the paint used on the outside of the ship. This paint was made of the same type of material that is used to power rockets. Others say some kind of spark made the hydrogen gas catch fire. Another explanation is that lightning struck the ship, though no witnesses saw any lightning.

The Hindenburg crash marked the end of airship travel, though it did not keep people from wanting to fly. Soon airplanes became the preferred method of travel through the air. Airships are used for little more than advertising and filming at sporting events these days and are called blimps. These blimps are filled with helium, because it is much less flammable than hydrogen. They don’t have a metal skeleton like the Hindenburg did either.

Read more about this fascinating event in history in one of the books we have about the Hindenburg disaster.

by: 
Kristin, Columbine Library

JCPL libraries are honored to display art by local school kids in their libraries. 

Here's what you'll see around the system this month:

Arvada Library: kites by the Mountain Phoenix Community School

Belmar Library: art by Green Gables and Westgate Elementary Schools

Columbine Library:  paintings and mixed media by Front Range Christian School through mid-May

Evergreen Library: paintings by 3rd grade Brownie Troupe 2266 from Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen

Golden Library: art by Golden High School

Lakewood Library: art by Pennington and Vivian Elementary Schools

Standley Lake Library: drawing, painting and mixed media by Standley Lake High School

Stop by and see some beautiful things at your local library this month!

by: 
Katie, Arvada Library

Kids from Kindergarten through 5th grade got together again for another round of LEGO at the Library!  Check out some of the stuff they built and join us at Arvada Library for more Lego programs this summer! 

Wednesday, June 26 at 4 and 5 p.m.

Wednesday, July 31 at 4 and 5 p.m.

Wednesday, August 28 at 4 and 5 p.m.

Tickets will be available at the Arvada Children's desk on the day of the event.  Participants may attend one Lego program per day.  Space is limited, so arrive early!

 

by: 
Connie, Lakewood Library

Family Night Storytime: Fun with Fiber Arts

Thursday, May 2 at 7 p.m.

Lakewood Library

The Recycled Lamb Yarn and Fiber
Arts store will join us for this special
storytime, featuring stories about
fiber arts, including a demonstration
of weaving, spinning and rope-
making. Kids will learn a new craft,
while adults will learn about this
exciting art form.

by: 
Diane, Standley Lake Library

Would you like to help your children be good readers? 

Certainly, there are many aids available, but one of my favorites is READING ROCKETS

What a great multimedia source of information for parents, teachers, librarians and other caring individuals to help launch strong, confident readers.  There's a wealth of information from research to current articles to interviews to helpful tips and much much more.  Public Broadcasting and the U.S. Department of Education partner to bring it to you online, on PBS television, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and iTunes!  So start your exploration of this great resource at Reading Rockets!

by: 
Rachel, Golden Library

Earth Day is celebrated on April 22nd in the United States. Senator Gaylord Nelson from Wisconsin first proposed Earth Day. He wanted to encourage respect for all life on Earth and to stress his concern about pollution of soil, air, and water.

The first Earth Day was celebrated in San Francisco, California on April 22, 1970 and 20 million people took part in helping to raise awareness about caring for the planet. Since its creation, Earth Day has helped to inspire the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts.

Check out these fun Earth Day facts!
-You can light one 100-watt bulb for four hours with the amount of electricity that is saved by recycling one glass bottle!
-Over 100 billion pieces of junk mail are delivered in the United States every year.
-Some office supply stores have begun selling office paper made entirely without trees.
-Tin pop cans are made of steel. Every year, Americans throw away enough steel to build all of the new cars in the United States.
-The Chinese made the first piece of recycled paper out of old, used fishing nets in 200 B.C.

Check out some books about Earth Day and ecology for kids! 

by: 
Kristin, Columbine Library

Have you heard of Amy Krouse Rosenthal?  If you haven't- you should read all of her books today!  She is one of my favorite authors and has written many fun, creative books for kids.  Amy's imagination is unlimited and it shows in everything she does.  If you have a few minutes, check out her blog which includes ideas for books, cool videos and lots of other fun stuff.    

Amy's most recent book is titled Exclamation Mark and it is every bit as clever and fun to read as her other books.  

Exclamation Mark just doesn't fit in.  He tries everything to be more like the other puncuations, but his enthusiam just makes him stand out.  Once he meets Question Mark, he discovers maybe it's not so bad to be different?   Maybe it's okay to be enthusiastic?!  A perfect book about celebrating individuality-- and kids might learn a little about punctuation, too!

 

by: 
Brian, Conifer Library

Saturday April 20th, The Conifer Story Time will have a special guest. Local author Joan Arent will visit the library and help me with story time at 11:30 am. Joan will be reading two of her books and have the kids doing some different games and activities associated with the books. 

Peek-a-Boo Who? inspires children to read and learn with guessing games, playing Peek-A-Boo, through noun awareness and word association.

The Bird Herd Goes to Bed is an enchanting story that helps children find comfort in going to sleep.

No tickets are necessary. If you have any questions please call the library at 303-235-JCPL (5275) and ask for Brian at Conifer Library. 

by: 
Leslie, Evergreen Library

Wednesday, April 17, at 4 p.m.

At the Evergreen Library  

For kids ages 8 and up

Come meet Andy Griffiths, the nationally known children's writer - the author of The Big Fat Cow That Goes Kapow, Killer Koalas From Outer Space, What Body Part is That, and The Day My Butt Went Pyscho.  Find out where he gets his crazy ideas, how he knows what will work for a story- AND, what is the title of his new book coming out in July??

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