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by: 
mackenzie

If you’ve been following JCPL on Twitter or Facebook, you might have seen posts about Zinio. If you haven’t been following us, a) You really need to because we’re awesome, b) you might not know that Zinio is a free way to get magazines on your eReader, tablet, computer, or smartphone. All you have to do grab your library card, visit out Downloads page, and click on Zinio to get access to over 150 magazine titles! 

 

We’ve added nine new titles in 2016, eight of which are for kids and teens! Our new titles include:

Dr. Oz the Good Life

American Girl Magazine

Ask

Babybug        

Click

High Five (Highlight High Five)

Ladybug

Muse

Seventeen

Want to load your tablet or eReader up with even more downloads? Check out Hoopla, Overdrive, 3M Cloud Library, and One Click Digital!

 

Happy eReading in 2016!

by: 
cindy

This is a Library 2 You Dial Program, which means that you can participate by phone!

Join Jefferson County Public Library and Laura Daily from Mile High on the Cheap in this phone program to learn about discounts and deals.  During this fast-paced discussion, learn ways to score freebies including restaurant meals, groceries, beauty & health products, entertainment and loyalty programs for seniors.  

10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 11

Call 303-275-6173 to register and we will call you at the time of the program.

by: 
mackenzie

For the longest time, I thought that New Year’s resolutions were a marketing ploy invented decades ago to sell exercise equipment. Recently, I did some research and discovered that New Year’s resolutions are a tradition that actually dates back thousands of years! Now that I know that New Year’s resolutions have such a rich history, I feel better about wanting to make a few in 2016. Even better, I know that I can use my library to achieve resolutions like:

Get in shape

Organize my life 

Be more involved in the community

Try my hand at DIY projects

Cook my own meals 

Learn a new language

Spend more time reading

And Jeffco Library has some New Year’s resolutions for 2016 too! Resolutions like restoring pre-recession hours (coming in April!); increasing the number of books, movies, and music in our collection; and updating the technology in all our libraries.  Hands down, 2016 is going to be our best year yet!

 

by: 
carol

Join us for screenings of some of the finest cinema produced. In January, come experience the documentary Free Angela & All Political Prisoners. This film "... may seem to take place in a distant past, but it resonates with improbable timeliness." (Ann Hornaday, Washington Post) Suitable for ages 18+.

5:30 p.m., Saturday, January 9

Belmar 

Adults

by: 
carol

Can you handle the truth? Family history research is a burgeoning pursuit thanks to TV programs like "Who Do You Think You Are?", "Genealogy Roadshow," and "Finding Your Roots." But before you jump in, have you asked yourself if you’re fully prepared for what you might discover? Together we will be opening closets to expose skeletons, peeking under the lid of Pandora's Box, and shining light on the ethical dilemmas you may encounter in the quest to find your missing ancestors. They may have good reasons why they're hiding from you.

2:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 9

Evergreen

Ages: Adults

by: 
mackenzie

What’s a Teen Advisory Board (TAB)? It’s a fancy way of describing a group of teens who are interested in becoming more involved in their community and library. These teens work with teen librarians to determine which areas of service they wish to focus. Teens can give input on library Young Adult books and materials, help lead/create programming, volunteer at events, organize community service projects, and influence how their library serves their community.  

We asked some of our Teen Advisory Board members why they decided to get involved with Jeffco Library and here’s what they said:

“I decided to join TAB for a few reasons. One thing was that I had been to a few teen functions at the library before, and it seemed like planning the events would be something I would enjoy. Also, I had been to a meeting at another library with some of my friends, and the experience was a unique and really enjoyable one.”

                                                                -Izzy, Columbine Library

 

“I decided to join TAB because I decided I would like to be more involved with the community and help others (give back).”

                                                                -Angelica, Lakewood Library

 

“I wanted to help the library with its events, and I had some ideas that I wanted to put in. I also volunteered at the library over the summer and I wanted to continue to support some of its great programs.”

                                                                -Ellie, Columbine library

We also asked our TAB members why they think other teens should join them.  Here are their reasons.  

“Everyone in TAB is super fun, creative, and really amazing to be around. The behind-the-scenes planning is a very unique and awesome experience that can spark many creative muses in anyone. And, lastly we get to talk about a lot of awesome stuff that is exclusive to TAB. And the cookies; cookies are one of the best parts.”

-Izzy, Columbine Library

 

“It’s fun to plan events, it makes you think about younger kids, after hours parties are fun, especially for 8th-9th graders. “

                                                                                -Annie, Lakewood Library

 

“TAB is a great way to get involved with the community and know what’s going on with your local library (events, movies, etc.).”

                                                                -Angelica, Lakewood Library

 

TAB is fun, helps with creativity and planning skills, and you can meet some awesome people that have similar interests to yours.

                                                                                -Ellie, Columbine Library

               

If you love what's going on at the library and you want to supply a little bit of your brand of awesomeness to the events that will going on in the future, come on over the TAB side, we have cookies!!!

                                                                -Mykenna, Columbine Library

To review: TABs let you get involved with your library, plan teen events, and give back to your community. It's also fun and creative, lets you connect with other cool people, allows you to see behind the scenes, and you occasionally get cookies. Want to get involved in your library’s TAB? We’re taking new members for 2016 now! All you have to do is connect with your local Teen librarian to get involved!   

 

by: 
mackenzie

Every December, more and more “Best Books of the Year” lists pop up across social media. We thought it would be fun to ask our Facebook and Instagram followers to share the titles of the best books they read in 2015 and here’s what they said. 

Fiction

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara 

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realize, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome -- but that will define his life forever.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr  

From the highly acclaimed, multiple award-winning Anthony Doerr, the beautiful, stunningly ambitious instant New York Times bestseller about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths collide in occupied France as both try to survive the devastation of World War II. (By the way, this title is one the Belmar Library’s book group will be reading in 2016 in case you want to participate in the discussion!)

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Lydia is dead. But they don't know this yet. So begins the story of this exquisite debut novel, about a Chinese American family living in 1970s small-town Ohio. A profoundly moving story of family, history, and the meaning of home, Everything I Never Told You is both a gripping page-turner and a sensitive family portrait, exploring the divisions between cultures and the rifts within a family, and uncovering the ways in which mothers and daughters, fathers and sons, and husbands and wives struggle, all their lives, to understand one another.

Fourth of July Creek by Smith Henderson 

After his daughter disappears, social worker Pete Snow must face the fact he has failed his own family as he is drawn into a manhunt when his client--a disturbed and paranoid survivalist--sparks the interest of the F.B.I.

Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford 

Set in the ethnic neighborhoods of Seattle during World War II and Japanese American internment camps of the era, this novel tells the story of widower Henry Lee, his immigrant Chinese father, and his first love Keiko Okabe.

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

Composed with the skills of a master, The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America, and a drama of almost unbearable acuity and power. It is a story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the enormous power of art.

The Homecoming of Samuel Lake by Jenny Wingfield 

The rigid moral codes held by mid-twentieth-century preacher Samuel Lake are called into question when his twelve-year-old daughter and his neighbors hide a young boy from his abusive father, a man who lashes out at the community when he learns about the deception.

The Martian by Andy Weir

Six days ago, astronaut Mark Watney became one of the first people to walk on Mars. Now, he's sure he'll be the first person to die there. After a dust storm nearly kills him and forces his crew to evacuate while thinking him dead, Mark finds himself stranded and completely alone with no way to even signal Earth that he's alive--and even if he could get word out, his supplies would be gone long before a rescue could arrive. Will his resourcefulness be enough to overcome the impossible odds against him?

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline 

"Ready Player One takes place in the not-so-distant future--the world has turned into a very bleak place, but luckily there is OASIS, a virtual reality world that is a vast online utopia. People can plug into OASIS to play, go to school, earn money, and even meet other people (or at least they can meet their avatars), and for protagonist Wade Watts it certainly beats passing the time in his grim, poverty-stricken real life.. Stuffed to the gills with action, puzzles, nerdy romance, and 80s nostalgia, this high energy cyber-quest will make geeks everywhere feel like they were separated at birth from author Ernest Cline.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John  Mandel

The sudden death of a Hollywood actor during a production of "King Lear" marks the beginning of the world's dissolution in a story told at various past and future times from the perspectives of the actor and four of his associates. 

Nonfiction

Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety by Eric Schlosser 

Presents a minute-by-minute account of an H-bomb accident that nearly caused a nuclear disaster, examining other near misses and America's growing susceptibility to a catastrophic event.

Grandma Gatewood’s Walk: The Inspiring Story of the Woman Who Saved the Appalachian Trail by Ben Montgomery 

Emma Gatewood told her family she was going on a walk and left her small Ohio hometown with a change of clothes and less than two hundred dollars. The next anybody heard from her, this genteel, farm-reared, 67-year-old great-grandmother had walked 800 miles along the 2,050-mile Appalachian Trail. 

The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey by Rinker Buck 

Buck's epic account of traveling the length of the Oregon Trail the old-fashioned way--in a covered wagon with a team of mules, an audacious journey that hasn't been attempted in a century--tells the rich history of the trail, the people who made the migration, and its significance to the country.

The Secret Life of Lobsters: How Fishermen and Scientists Are Unraveling the Mysteries of Our Favorite Crustacean by Trevor Corson

In this intimate portrait of an island lobstering community and an eccentric band of renegade biologist, journalist Trevor Corson escorts the reader onto the slippery decks of fishing boats, through danger-filled scuba dives, and deep into the churning currents of the Gulf of Maine to learn about the secret undersea lives of lobsters.

Teen Fiction

Cinder by Marissa Meyer  

As plague ravages the overcrowded Earth, observed by a ruthless lunar people, Cinder, a gifted mechanic and cyborg, becomes involved with handsome Prince Kai and must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect the world in this futuristic take on the Cinderella story.

The Kiss of Deception by Mary E. Pearson 

On the morning of her wedding, Princess Lia flees to a distant village. She settles into a new life, intrigued when two mysterious and handsome strangers arrive--and unaware that one is the jilted prince and the other an assassin sent to kill her. Deception abounds, and Lia finds herself on the brink of unlocking perilous secrets--even as she finds herself falling in love,

The Winner’s Curse by Marie Rutkoski 

An aristocratic girl who is a member of a warmongering and enslaving empire purchases a slave, an act that sets in motion a rebellion that might overthrow her world as well as her heart.

J Fiction

Wonder by R. J. Palacio 

Ten-year-old Auggie Pullman, who was born with extreme facial abnormalities and was not expected to survive, goes from being home-schooled to entering fifth grade at a private middle school in Manhattan, which entails enduring the taunting and fear of his classmates as he struggles to be seen as just another student.

 

What was the best book you read in 2015? Take a selfie of yourself with your favorite read of 2015 and tag us in it on Instagram or Facebook!  We’ll choose one winner to receive a fun JCPL swag bag!

by: 
carol

Things are gonna get wild in Wheat Ridge.

Join Nature's Educators for Talon Talk and learn about characteristics that define birds of prey from others. Just as the name states, birds of prey hunt and feed off animals. They’re built with incredible eye sight, strong talons and heavy-duty beaks. A few familiar birds of prey include condors, eagles, falcons, hawks, osprey, owls, and vultures. Nature’s Educators come in for a landing at Wheat Ridge to teach about the birds' personal histories, anatomy, hunting strategies, habitats, and why they're important to our ecosystems. Spread your wings and meet some fine feathered stars of the talon show. Space is limited to the first 30 participants.

2 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 30

All ages
Wheat Ridge

by: 
carol

We've rescheduled this program for Dec. 30, 6 - 8 p.m.

It’s not always about the North Pole in December. While the little ones may be focused on the North Pole, you can have fun learning about the South Pole. 

Roald Amundsen reached the South Pole on December 15, 1911. Known as “the last of the Vikings,” Amundsen and his expedition team from newly-independent Norway raced against the British Empire in one of the greatest international races prior to the race to the moon. As you can imagine, the journey was full of tragedy and triumph.

Join us as a member from Active Minds tells Amundsen’s historic and adventurous tale. It’s a very cool way to celebrate the anniversary of this polarizing event. Yes, I just said that. And yes, my puns are going south.

6 p.m. Dec. 30

Belmar

by: 
carol

‘Tis the season… for puppets! 

Yep, it’s time again for the Evergreen Librarians to entertain with their annual holiday puppet show. Come watch and share the magic with two special themed shows. You can also show your holiday spirit with interactive songs and rhymes. This is an annual favorite, so bring the whole family (all ages welcome!) to join the fun. 

Register online 

Ages: All 

4:15 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 9

Evergreen

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