Sept. 5 -  All libraries will be closed for Labor Day.

Sept. 16-24 - Lakewood Library parking lot repairs. More info

 

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by: 
Jill J. Outreach Librarian, Kids & Families

Recently, I have been focusing on encouraging my kindergartner to use his narrative skills. This is an important early literacy skill because it involves having kids describe things and events by telling stories, knowing the order of events, and making predictions. Many of our story times have involved my son “reading” to me and telling me stories. For example, he has especially enjoyed reading and acting out the classic story the Three Little Pigs. Check out Paul Galdone’s version of the classic tale.

By asking my son questions about the stories we read together, he can practice being a narrator or storyteller. This helps kids make connections between books and their own lives. Also, don’t be afraid to read a story over and over again. When kids hear a story over and over again, they are absorbing the structure of that story.  This helps them to be able to act it out on their own.  And THAT gets them excited about reading!

You can expand this by asking your child to talk about doing an activity in various steps. For instance, have your child help you bake cookies. Then, have them talk with you about what you did first, then next, then next and what you did last. Or have them draw a picture of the cookie making process and show it in stages. You could even have them draw the scenes in separate boxes. Cut out each “boxed “ scene and then have your child put them in sequential order. Some of the first stages of writing involve drawing pictures and then telling stories about what the pictures represent. Encourage a child's narrative skills by saying, “Tell me about this picture!” or “What's happening in this picture?”

Here are some great wordless books that kids can use to have fun exercising their narrative skills:

Red Hat by Lita Judge

Flora and the Penguin by Molly Idle

A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka

Quest by Aaron Becker

 

Image credit: Casa Thomas Jefferson on Flickr.

by: 
cindy

“People may go to the library looking mainly for information, but they find each other there.” - Robert Putnam

If you’ve been to the library in the last couple of years, you know it’s MUCH more than a place to find something to read or do research. It’s a place to connect.

People are finding their connection through eBooks, audiobooks, interactive language learning, computer access, storytelling, teen meet-ups, and craft sessions. And that’s just naming a few.

Think about the impact on the community. Parents bring their babies to hear stories, sing songs and make friends. Students come in for help on tough homework assignments. The career-minded explore online job possibilities. The wiser population learns a computer skill to keep their minds active. The possibilities truly are endless.

We celebrate the joy of helping our community make connections. We also ask for our community to come together in support.

There are many ways you can make a connection:

  • Give money – This one’s easy, just spare a few dollars with a few clicks
  • Volunteer – Connect and make friends while you help with our popular annual book sales, fundraising events, book donation processing, and other programs.
  • Donate books – There are never enough!
  • Share your library experience – Spread the word. The more people we can connect with, the stronger our community becomes.

Think about how you would answer the following: “At the library, I…”

• Made a friend.
• Was enthralled by a storyteller.
• Found a book.
• Got an A.
• Listened to a song.
• Learned a lesson.
• Discovered an author.
• Built a Lego house.
• Found a job.
• Got inspired.
• Solved a problem.
• Wrote a poem.
• Learned a language.
• Made a decision.
• Read with a dog.
• Struck a pose.

Tell us how you connect with your library by sending us an eMail or sharing your connection on Facebook or Twitter.

by: 
Barbara, Evergreen Library

Things to be grateful for:

Family - Check

Friends - Check

Living in Colorado - Check

Health - Check

Low Gas Prices - Double Check

Great Books I've Read, or Am Planning to Read This Year - Check

Sharing That List with EVERYONE - Check

MY DIARY FROM THE EDGE OF THE WORLD

Jodi Lynn Anderson

 THE THING ABOUT JELLYFISH

Ali Benjamin 

THE WAR THAT SAVED MY LIFE

Kim Brubaker Bradley

 GEORGE

Alex Gino 

LOST IN THE SUN

Lisa Graff

 LISTEN, SLOWLY

Thanhha Lai 

FRIENDS FOR LIFE

Andrew Norriss

THE NEST

Kenneth OPPEL

 THE MARVELS

Brian Selznick

 GOODBYE STRANGER

Rebecca Stead

 Wonderful People to Share My Favorite Books With - CHECK!

by: 
Rebecca

It's a new day for Jefferson County Public Library!

Based on unofficial election results, Jefferson County voters have approved a mill-levy increase for the Library. (There are still votes to be counted, and they won't certify the election for another couple of weeks, but campaign pundits are telling us to expect a win!)

The one-mill increase will enable the library to restore library services to pre-recession levels. Here's what you can expect in 2016:

  • We hope to restore library hours in April. It will take us some time to hire and train employees, but our goal is to launch expanded hours on April 3.
  • We'll spend approximately $2 million more on books and materials.
  • We'll begin to update public access computers and our technology infrastructure.
  • Other initiatives, such as refurbishing library buildings and enhancing services in underserved areas will take a little longer.

We couldn't have accomplished this without the support and dedication of an army of library advocates: the Library Board of Trustees, the Jefferson County Library Foundation, Friends of the Library, community leaders, volunteers, employees, patrons and residents. We are enormously grateful for their passion, interest, civic-mindedness, friendship and support!

We are excited to be moving forward into this new day, one in which we'll be able to fulfill our community's shared vision of library services - and become the library we know we can be.

We'll be posting updates on the restoration of services on our Director's Blog. You can sign up to receive updates here

by: 
carol

Our Foundation's new look is in sight! Jefferson County Library Foundation just flipped the switch on their newly-designed and responsive website. "Responsive" means that the site is easily accessible on any device, including a computer monitor, a tablet and a cellphone. In other words, when you need to know, it's info on the go.

The Jeffco Library and Jefferson County Library Foundation (JCLF) have a symbiotic relationship. The Foundation supports programs to "enrich the capabilities, resources and services of the Jefferson County Public Library through fundraising and advocacy efforts that benefit our diverse community."

Being a Friend has its benefits.
One important thing you'll learn about on the Foundation's new website is "Friends of Jefferson County Public Library," which is a county-wide group dedicated to enhancing the resources of Jefferson County Public Library. Members are people who cherish our Library and believe that JCPL is a valuable, essential and fundamental part of the community. Friends lend their voices, time and resources to ensure quality library services in Jefferson County.

As for benefits, as a Friend of JCPL, you get:

  • The Friends’ Footnotes quarterly newsletter
  • 10% discount at the Friends’ Gift and Book Shop
  • Admission to Friends’ Preview Night at the Fall Whale of a Used Book Sale
  • Free entrance to the Annual Meeting featuring a Pulitzer Prize winner headliner (Next up: January 29, 2016 and features Elizabeth Fenn)
  • Satisfaction of knowing you are supporting the mission of Jefferson County Public Library!

Fire up a new browser and check out the new ‘n’ improved jeffcolibraryfoundation.org

 

by: 
Barbara, Evergreen Library

A long time ago in a galaxy far far away...a farm boy, a jedi, a smuggler, a wookie, a sith lord, two droids and a princess walk into a bar, quite literally, and set the stage, for the ultimate battle of good vs. evil, and the Star Wars universe was born! If you're like me, and a few million other fans, you only watched Monday Night Football last week to see the, latest and last, trailer for Star Wars the Force Awakens, and it didn't disappoint. Now you ask, what is a diehard fan to do, between now and December 18th?

READ of course! and attend an upcoming Star Wars Program @ your local library.

(If you missed, or even if you didn't, the Star Wars the Force Awakens trailer, check out the video at the bottom of this post!)

Star Wars, a New Hope: The Princess, the Scoundrel, and the Farm Boy

by Alexandra Bracken

Star Wars, the Empire Strikes Back: So You Want to be a Jedi?

by Adam Gidwitz

Star Wars, Return of the Jedi: Beware the Power of the Dark Side

by Tom Angleberger

Star Wars the Weapon of a Jedi: a Luke Skywalker Adventure

by Jason Fry

Star Wars Moving Target: a Princess Leia Adventure

by Cecil Castellucci

Star Wars Smuggler's Run: a Han Solo & Chewbacca Adventure

by Greg Rucka

Happy Reading and May the Force be With You!!!

 

by: 
Karen, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

I love the fall! From the changing leaves to drinking hot apple cider on chilly evenings, the fall brings a rich variety of things to do and to make.  When I was a teacher, we would go on nature walks and talk about the season changes while collecting leaves for crafts and games.  I thought I would share a couple of my favorite craft activities as well as some fall themed books.  I savor this season as long as I can before the snow flies!

*I found instructions for these activities and more on www.kidsactivities.net. Make sure to check out 'Stained Glass Leaves with crayons'.  Another one of my favorites!

1. Sun Prints

You will need: Colored construction paper (that can fade in the sun), leaves gathered outside, glue stick or liquid glue, tape

  • Dab a bit of glue into the back of a leaf.  I suggest using leaves that are not too crunchy.
  • Glue the leaf to a piece of construction paper.
  • Tape the paper to a sunny window with the leaf facing outside.  Leave for 3-4 days or until you notice the paper color has faded.
  • Remove from window and gently peal the leaf off to reveal the print.  
  • Talk science with your child! Why did the paper around the leaf fade? (bleaching)  Why didn't the paper under the leaf fade? (not exposed to the light or shadowed)

2. Leaf Animals, People, Cars...

You will need: A variety of leaf types- different shapes, sizes and colors, construction paper, liquid glue, tape, crayons or markers

  • Gather different kinds of leaves outside- make sure they aren't too dry!  Talk about sizes, shapes, colors.  
  • Arrange leaves on paper to make an animal or person or car.  What other things can your child think of?
  • Glue each piece on the paper.  Let your creation dry.  Tape can help hold leaf edges down.  
  • Use crayons or markers to draw eyes, other body parts and details.  Make a fall scene! 

 

Fall themed books to inspire you! 

Fall Leaves by Loretta Holland. Gorgeous Illustrations light up each page!

Winter is Coming by Tony Johnston. See the fall through the little girl's eyes as she returns to same place to watch autumn change to winter.  

 

Photo credit: Flickr

by: 
Anna, Kids and Families Outreach Librarian

I recently heard Rae Pica speak on the importance of moving while learning. This is active learning; engaging the body and mind. Research shows children learn best when they experience new ideas and concepts through play and movment. In an article Pica wrote titled In Defense of Active Learningshe explains that moving our bodies helps activate our brains. She had a few cute pre-writing movement ideas I thought would be fun to do at home with your little ones. 

- Hand and Finger Activities: Sing "Open, Shut Them". Many libraries sing this song to begin their Storytimes. This song activates the brains of our babies, toddlers, and preschoolers as they practice their hand-eye coordination; a must-have pre-writing skill.  

- Sky Writers: Use your index finger to "write" a letter, word, or a name in the sky. This will help your child practice the feeling of straight and curvy. You could take this a step further and pretend to put your sky writer in your belly button or on the tip of your nose while writing the word in the air. Kids love the belly button writer and it's super cute to watch too! 

- The Above, Below, and On movement: Tape a line on the floor, use the straight edge of a rug or strech a ribbon across the floor and jump above the line, below the line, or on the line. This will help your child understand where to start and where to finish writing lower case and upper case letters. After playing this game, practice writing letters, words, or names on paper. 

- Build a Story: Start a story and take turns adding to the plot creating the beginning, middle, and end of a story. For example, you could start this activity by saying, " Once there was a dog who..." and let your child add the next idea. Then you, or another family member contributes the following part of the story. This activity demonstrates the beginning, middle, and end of a story. It's a great way to pass the time in the car too! 

-The Mirror Game: This game is important for replicating what the eye sees. This replication is what learning to write is all about. Stand infront of your child and take turns mimicing each others' movements. You and your child should try to move as if you were seeing a reflection of yourself in the mirror. Lucy does it best in this video clip below. Lucy is a crack up and I think this should have you and your child smiling too! Go ahead, throw on that Halloween costume while you do this! 

Come to one of our 'Movin and Grovin' Fests'. The next fest is this Saturday, October 24th, at the Arvada Library and the Evergreen Library from 11:00am-4:00pm. We will have crafts! 

Photo Credit: Neville Nel

by: 
carol

Register now for Monday's special presentation with author Ann Ross through the Libary to You's special Author Phone Talk. Listen in as Ann Ross discusses the writing, characters and plots of the popular Miss Julia mystery series. One fan pegs the infamous Miss Julia as “a strong, sassy, Southern woman transformed by dramatic and sometimes comical circumstances outside her control.” The sixteenth in the series, Miss Julia Lays Down the Law is perhaps the steel magnolia’s most exciting adventure yet.

We'll be live tweeting throughout the talk, so if you haven't already followed us on Twitter, be sure to do so here.

About the Book

At first, Miss Julia and the other A-list ladies are pleased to be invited over to newcomer Connie Clayborn’s for coffee, but the afternoon turns into a slap in the face when their snobby hostess spouts nonstop criticism about Abbotsville. Why, how dare she?

Days later, Miss Julia decides to confront Connie woman to woman, but when she arrives, Connie is lying on the kitchen floor—lifeless in a pool of blood. Who could have done this? Miss Julia will need to find out fast—particularly because her fingerprints are now all over the crime scene...

We welcome 100 participants to listen to the presentation and then have questions answered by the author! Submit your questions and comments when you register at homeservices@jeffcolibrary.org or by calling 303.275.6173. 

Date: Monday, November 16, 2015

Time: 1 – 2 p.m. MT

Location: We’ll call the number you register with, so listen in from wherever y'all are!

Check out the book from Jeffco Library. Also, autographed copies of Ms. Ross’ books are available from her hometown bookstore, The Fountainhead Bookstore. Call 828-697-1870 to order and be sure to mention “Jeffco Library” for special autograph and inscription requests.

Limited to the first 100 registrants.

 

by: 
mackenzie

Teen Read Week™ is a national adolescent literacy initiative created by the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA). It began in 1998 and is held annually in October to encourage teens to be regular readers and library users. We’re kicking off Teen Read Week by highlighting some of the programs and opportunities Jeffco Library offers exclusively for teens.

Teen Advisory Board

We include actual teenagers in the decisions we make regarding teen programming and materials. Every library has its own TAB (Teen Advisory Board), a group of teens interested in becoming more involved in their library and community. These teens work with our Teen Services staff to give input on library YA collections, contribute to the Teen blog, help create teen programming, volunteer at events, organize community service projects, and influence how their library serves teens. Want to learn more about joining your local TAB? Just ask your local Teen librarian. 

Teen Blog Submission

We love highlighting our teens’ amazing talent! Teens can submit their original creative writing, editorials, book/movie reviews, photography, or artwork to be featured on our Teen Blog. Check out what’s been posted recently and submit your own work.

Movie Passes

Our Teen Services Coordinator has incredible connections that get our teens exclusive access to FREE passes to advanced screenings of hot movies, like Goosebumps and Me & Earl & The Dying Girl. Join her email list so you can learn about upcoming advanced screening passes too! 

After Dark Events

Ever wonder what your local library’s like after hours? Many of our libraries become TEEN ONLY zones once a month by offering programing that takes place after we’ve kicked everyone else out of the library. Find an After Dark event at your library.  

Tutoring

Teens can get homework help from Colorado School of Mines student volunteers every Wednesday and Thursday at the Golden Library.

Special Events

Our Teen Services staff puts on more programs and events for teens than we can count; LEGO Clubs, movie nights, writing workshops, and more! See all our Teen events right here

 

You can learn more about Teen Read Week and join the conversation about it on Twitter with #TRW15.

 

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