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Crazy Readerz

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

Have you read The Selection yet? I think it reads like a cross between a reality TV dating show and the royal wedding. When the prince needs to find a wife, 35 young women are selected to live with him in the palace. They are sent home as he weeds them out until only one woman remains--the one who will become Queen. All this is broadcast on TV and the families of the women are rewarded depending on how far the girls make it in the competition.

The Selection was optioned for a TV show right when it came out, and now the CW has approved a script for the pilot. I'm excited to see how this turns out because it was such a fun book! Here's a trailer for the book, which may give you some ideas for what the show could look like:

While we wait for the show, get yourself on the hold list for the sequel, The Elite, which comes out April 23.

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

-School debate coming up?
-Argumentative research paper?
-Argumentative friend?

Opposing Viewpoints in Context is a great resource for all these things and more! They take current events and ethically controversial topics and give you all the information you would need to make an informed argument. For example, I looked up school uniforms. First I get an article outlining all the background info I need, such as the difference between dress codes and uniforms, court cases, the cost of uniforms, and issues with sweat shops. I can also read arguments for and against school uniforms, such as “School Uniforms Stifle Freedom of Expression” or “School Dress Codes are Necessary and Constitutional,” which lay out the pros and cons of the issue and include great examples. Then I can read through magazine and newspapers articles about the topic, listen to audio files, watch videos, get statistics, and link to other websites. And all of this information is in one place and easy to use!

You can access Opposing Viewpoints in Context by going to jeffcolibrary.org/teens and then clicking on “Homework Help.” You don’t have to be in the library to use it—just log in with your name and library card number. Search for what you’re interested in, or click on “Browse Issues” to get ideas. Winning an argument is always fun; now you can be prepared!

by: 
Pam, Standley Lake Library

In this post-apocalyptic world, people have chosen to live one of two ways, as Dwellers who live in pods that protect them from the aether (electrical storms that ravage the earth) or on the outside in tribes facing nature and a hard scrabble existence. Dwellers spend the majority of their life traveling virtual realms and when Aria is cast out of the Reverie pod accused of mayhem and murder, it is an almost certain death sentence. Aria’s one hope is to find her mother who is working in another pod, Bliss, and prove her innocence.

Perry, a member of the Tides tribe, is heading toward Reverie, to rescue his nephew who was taken by Dwellers when he finds Aria in the desert near death. He shares his food and water and they discover that they can help each other. He can help Aria stay alive and find her mother. Aria’s knowledge of the pods can help him get his nephew back. It’s an uneasy alliance born from need and desperation rather than respect because they both have been raised to fear and hate the other’s way of life and people.

You'll stay up all night with this one. The second book, Through the Ever Night was released last month. Put yourself on the hold list as soon as you check out Under the Never Sky. You will want to read it as soon as possible!

by: 
Pam, Standley Lake Library

Egg Decorating

Standley Lake Library
Tweens and Teens
Saturday, March 16th
2:00 – 3:30 pm

(photo credit: praktyczny_przewodnik on Flickr)

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

 

Hooray! I feel like I've been waiting forever for this. We're going to be making marshmallow catapults at the Columbine Library!

Monday, March 11, 4pm
Columbine Library

No need to sign up--just come by. Open to all teens ages 11-18.

by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

 

Teen Night: Movie and Zombie Felties

Friday, March 8

6:30-8:30 pm

Evergreen Library

We'll be making zombie felties and watching a related movie. The movie is a remake of a 1984 short film of the same name (which traumatized me when I saw it as a kid), about a boy and his dog, Sparky. The new version was an Academy Award nominee for Best Animated Feature. Can you guess the title?

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

Will Henry is the assistant to Dr. Warthrop, a monstrumologist who studies those dark creatures who haunt our nightmares.  When a strange corpse is delivered to their doorstep Will Henry and Dr. Warthrop discover and attempt to destroy a pod of Anthropophagi living in their home town.  Warning!  This book is not for the easily scared (like me). 

by: 
Erin, Golden Library

 

At last! The long wait is over!  The second book, following Cinder, in The Lunar Chronicles is here and it does not disappoint! Meyer has a really accessible writing style and this novel is fast paced with engaging characters. There's also a nice re-imagining of the Little Red Riding Hood tale just for good measure.

In this installment Cinder's trying to break out of prison--even though if she succeeds, she'll be the Commonwealth's most wanted fugitive. Halfway around the world, Scarlet Benoit's grandmother is missing. It turns out there are many things Scarlet doesn't know about her grandmother or the grave danger she has lived in her whole life. When Scarlet encounters Wolf, a street fighter who may have information as to her grandmother's whereabouts, she is loath to trust the stranger, but is inexplicably drawn to him, and he to her. As Scarlet and Wolf unravel one mystery, they encounter another when they meet Cinder. Now, all of them must stay one step ahead of the vicious Lunar Queen Levana, who will do anything for the handsome Prince Kai to become her husband, her king, her prisoner.

Scarlet has a long hold list but it is well worth the wait. It is also one of our Lucky Day titles so check the library when you are here and see if you get lucky!

 

by: 
Tana, Arvada Library

Trapped inside a chain superstore by an apocalyptic sequence of natural and human disasters, six high school kids from various popular and unpopular social groups struggle for survival while protecting a group of younger children.

OMG! OMG! OMG!

Ok. Look. By the middle of the second page I was in it to win it with this book.  Not sure if it’s the locality of the story (Colorado Springs), if it’s the ages of the characters (first graders through high school) or if it is the crazy-non-stop-tell-me-this-can-not-ever-happen-here--WHAT!?-it-might-happen-next-week-OMG! aspect that made Monument 14 by Emmy Laybourne so riveting for me, but… HOLY COW.

I’ll tell you what, though… my new end of the world survival plan includes a Super Target now.  ‘Nuff said.

by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

Set in the not-too-distant future, Robopocalypse describes a world in which robots have made our lives a lot easier – they fight our wars, clean our homes, and drive our cars. Then, under the control of a childlike yet sinister artificial intelligence called Archos, the robots turn against humanity in a terrifying and bloody attack known as Zero Hour. A group of international survivors – including a Japanese scientist, a London hacker, and a cop on an Oklahoma Indian reservation – stage an inventive counterattack in this action-packed thriller. The author, Daniel H. Wilson, has a PhD in robotics, so the story is full of astonishing technical detail. His latest novel, Amped, is also available. Fans of World War Z and other dystopian thrillers should give this one a try!

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