Crazy Readerz

by: 
Jessie, Columbine Library

 

Hooray! I feel like I've been waiting forever for this. We're going to be making marshmallow catapults at the Columbine Library!

Monday, March 11, 4pm
Columbine Library

No need to sign up--just come by. Open to all teens ages 11-18.

by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

 

Teen Night: Movie and Zombie Felties

Friday, March 8

6:30-8:30 pm

Evergreen Library

We'll be making zombie felties and watching a related movie. The movie is a remake of a 1984 short film of the same name (which traumatized me when I saw it as a kid), about a boy and his dog, Sparky. The new version was an Academy Award nominee for Best Animated Feature. Can you guess the title?

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

Will Henry is the assistant to Dr. Warthrop, a monstrumologist who studies those dark creatures who haunt our nightmares.  When a strange corpse is delivered to their doorstep Will Henry and Dr. Warthrop discover and attempt to destroy a pod of Anthropophagi living in their home town.  Warning!  This book is not for the easily scared (like me). 

by: 
Erin, Golden Library

 

At last! The long wait is over!  The second book, following Cinder, in The Lunar Chronicles is here and it does not disappoint! Meyer has a really accessible writing style and this novel is fast paced with engaging characters. There's also a nice re-imagining of the Little Red Riding Hood tale just for good measure.

In this installment Cinder's trying to break out of prison--even though if she succeeds, she'll be the Commonwealth's most wanted fugitive. Halfway around the world, Scarlet Benoit's grandmother is missing. It turns out there are many things Scarlet doesn't know about her grandmother or the grave danger she has lived in her whole life. When Scarlet encounters Wolf, a street fighter who may have information as to her grandmother's whereabouts, she is loath to trust the stranger, but is inexplicably drawn to him, and he to her. As Scarlet and Wolf unravel one mystery, they encounter another when they meet Cinder. Now, all of them must stay one step ahead of the vicious Lunar Queen Levana, who will do anything for the handsome Prince Kai to become her husband, her king, her prisoner.

Scarlet has a long hold list but it is well worth the wait. It is also one of our Lucky Day titles so check the library when you are here and see if you get lucky!

 

by: 
Tana, Arvada Library

Trapped inside a chain superstore by an apocalyptic sequence of natural and human disasters, six high school kids from various popular and unpopular social groups struggle for survival while protecting a group of younger children.

OMG! OMG! OMG!

Ok. Look. By the middle of the second page I was in it to win it with this book.  Not sure if it’s the locality of the story (Colorado Springs), if it’s the ages of the characters (first graders through high school) or if it is the crazy-non-stop-tell-me-this-can-not-ever-happen-here--WHAT!?-it-might-happen-next-week-OMG! aspect that made Monument 14 by Emmy Laybourne so riveting for me, but… HOLY COW.

I’ll tell you what, though… my new end of the world survival plan includes a Super Target now.  ‘Nuff said.

by: 
Briana, Evergreen Library

Set in the not-too-distant future, Robopocalypse describes a world in which robots have made our lives a lot easier – they fight our wars, clean our homes, and drive our cars. Then, under the control of a childlike yet sinister artificial intelligence called Archos, the robots turn against humanity in a terrifying and bloody attack known as Zero Hour. A group of international survivors – including a Japanese scientist, a London hacker, and a cop on an Oklahoma Indian reservation – stage an inventive counterattack in this action-packed thriller. The author, Daniel H. Wilson, has a PhD in robotics, so the story is full of astonishing technical detail. His latest novel, Amped, is also available. Fans of World War Z and other dystopian thrillers should give this one a try!

by: 
Tana, Arvada Library

Good news, Overachievers!  There is someone ready to help you brighten up your academic skill set so that you shine like the star you are meant to be!

Arvada Library procured for your intellectual enhancement our very own AmeriCorps Homework Help volunteer, Brian!  Yay, Brian!

Every Wednesday from 5 -7pm Brian will be available for tutoring in math, science, English and writing.  Just stop in at either the Children’s or Adult Reference desks and find the answers to your Homework woes.

 

by: 
Pam, Standley Lake Library

 

Standley Lake Library

Sat. Feb. 16th

2:00 – 3:30 pm

Make a catapult and participate in the Marshmallow Wars!

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

Did you see the movie / read the book Life of Pi?  Want to read some other books that give you a good sense of Indian culture and life?  Try some of these great reads:

Tiger's Curse by Colleen Houck
Seventeen-year-old Oregon teenager Kelsey forms a bond with a circus tiger who is actually one of two brothers, Indian princes Ren and Kishan, who were cursed to live as tigers for eternity, and she travels with him to India where the tiger's curse may be broken once and for all.

Karma by Cathy Ostlere
After her mother's suicide, Maya and her Sikh father travel to New Delhi from Canada to place her mother's ashes in their final resting place. On the night of their arrival, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi is assassinated.  Maya and her father are separated when the city erupts in chaos, and Maya must rely on Sandeep, a boy she has just met, for survival.

Anila's Journey by Mary Finn
In late eighteenth-century Calcutta, half-Indian half-Irish Anila Tandy finds herself alone with nothing but her artistic talent to rely on, searching for her father who is presumed dead.

Climbing the Stairs by Padma Venkatraman
In India, in 1941, when her father becomes brain-damaged in a non-violent protest march, fifteen-year-old Vidya and her family are forced to move in with her father's extended family and become accustomed to a totally different way of life.

Born Confused by Tanuja Desai Hidier
Dimple, whose family is from India, discovers that she is not Indian enough for the Indians and not American enough for the Americans. Where does she fit in when she is constantly pulled between these two opposing cultures?

by: 
Arra, Lakewood Library

February is African American History Month.  In celebration of this event here are a few amazing African American scientists:

George Washington Carver- From cosmetics to gasoline, Carver found more uses for the peanut than you might imagine.  Carver moved around quite a bit as a youth and often did a variety of odd jobs.  With this well-rounded education, both practical and from formal colleges like Simpson and the Agricultural College in Ames Iowa, he used his knowledge of chemistry and agriculture to try to improve the situation for poor southern farmers.

Percy Lavon Julian - Julian discovered a method to extract hormones and steroids from plants.  This discovery brought the cost of medicine down significantly and helped relieve everything from glaucoma to helping with fertility.  He also invented a fire fighting foam that was used in World War II.

Annie J. Easly - Best known for her work on the NASA Centaur rocket project, Easly joined NASA at the beginning of the space age. She wrote computer code that evaluated substitute power technologies, helped launch Centaur, identified wind, solar and other energy projects for NACA (now called NASA). She also helped invent other systems to solve energy problems.

Want to know more?  Check out our online database Science in Context.

 

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